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Sur le web j'ai vu cette phrase de temps en temps:

Ta farme tu ta yeule !

Je crois que ça veut dire en français normal:

Ferme ta bouche !

Mais évidemment, la première phase n'est pas du français habituel, c'est une tournure de phrase québecoise. Je ne comprends pas complètement la phrase; quelqu'un peut-il me dire pourquoi cela a la même signification que la traduction en français standard ?


I've seen the following phrase on the web from time to time:

Ta farme tu ta yeule !

I think it means, in standard French:

Ferme ta bouche ! [shut your mouth!]

But obviously, the former isn't standard French, but a quebecois turn of phrase. I don't really understand the phrase, so could someone show me how it carries the same meaning as the latter translation into standard French?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If we exclude the stronger phonetic stuff we get:

"t'a fermes-tu, ta gueule?"

short for

"tu (l)a fermes-tu, ta gueule?"

Which amounts to something like "Will you shut it already?!" given that this sounds like it was screamed angrily (and would still be pretty damn rude), I wouldn't feel bad about adding an f-bomb in the English translation either. Ferme-la! or la ferme! would be the more neutral forms. (I've never seen bouche show up in this context.)

As for the phonetics, it is common for /l/ to drop in pronouns if the vowels isn't a schwa. (Cf. /i/ for /il/). This promptly elides into "t'a". /ɛr/ or /ər/ to /ar/ is a very common sound change in informal Quebec French (e.g. charcher), while -tu is an emphasizer in questions.

I'm not sure what's the backstory of /yeule/ for gueule, but it's a standard lower register pronunciation, and generally palatalisation in front of a front vowel is hardly surprising.

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The general explanation is quite good, I mean for the phonetics, but I'm a bit disappointed by your standard french version. Tu vas la fermer ta gueule ? is closer to the quebecois meaning, and still very idiomatic. –  Romain VALERI Jun 20 at 8:03
    
I was looking for a register-neutral version. I have relatively limited version of European informal/slang French. –  Circeus Jun 20 at 8:31
    
No problem, it was just a suggestion for improvement on the standard french slang part. And I'm not myself a quebecois slang expert neither, I just happen to love Les colocs and Loco Locas, and both tend to make heavy use of that register. –  Romain VALERI Jun 20 at 10:14
    
"Tu la ferme"---> "T'a ferme" in France also, or only Quebec ? –  hunter Jun 25 at 11:26
    
I'm pretty sure this (specifically the elision of la's "L") is mostly a Quebec thing. –  Circeus Jun 25 at 14:49
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Being a French Canadian, I think I can help on that.

T'a fermes-tu ta yeule?

Between this sentence and your "France French" translation, the only real difference is yeule. This is deformed word from gueule, which means an animal mouth (pejorative for a human).

T'a is a shortened tu la. This is the same as Je suis which often is shortened to J'suis, Chuis or even Chu like in this next sentence :

Chu ben tanné d'écouter ses jokes plattes.

Fortunatly for foreigners, Quebec made a website that explains all of our Quebecism : http://www.immigrer.com/page/outils_dictionnaire-des-expressions-quebecoises.html

Good luck!

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Tu la fermes ta gueule? ou La fermes-tu ta gueule? c'est standard, la répétition *Tu* la fermes-*tu* ta gueule?, c'est pour autant que je le sache un québécisme. –  Un francophone Jun 20 at 14:38
    
@Unfrancophone, en effet, la répétition vient... marteler le message au destinataire, si je puis dire. Il en augmente le poids. Au Québec, tu n'entendras jamais Tu la fermes ta gueule? ni La fermes-tu ta gueule?, excepté si la personne imite un Français de France, même si cette phrase est grammaticalement incorrecte (la phrase québécoise). –  Sifu Jun 20 at 15:10
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