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How can you translate Dutch expression Ere wie ere toekomt (meaning roughly “credit where due”) in French?

I found this in Concise dictionary of European proverbs:

  • à chacun selon ses œuvres
  • à chacun selon son dû
  • à tout seigneur, tout honneur
  • rendez à César ce qui appartient à César
  • rendez donc à César ce qui est à César, et à Dieu ce qui est à Dieu
  • selon les gens l'encens

Which is better? Is one regularly used? What has Cesar herewith to do?


Comment traduire l'expression néerlandaise Ere wie de ere toekomt (qui signifie approximativement « honneur à qui honneur revient ») en français?

J'ai trouvé ces équivalents dans le Concise dictionary of European proverbs :

  • à chacun selon ses œuvres
  • à chacun selon son dû
  • à tout seigneur, tout honneur
  • rendez à César ce qui appartient à César
  • rendez donc à César ce qui est à César, et à Dieu ce qui est à Dieu
  • selon les gens l'encens

Lequel est le meilleur ? Que vient faire César dans cette histoire ?

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Some more fuel for the meta discussions on source language (with here a question in not-too-good English about a translation from another language). Please do discuss on meta: meta.french.stackexchange.com/questions/92/… and meta.french.stackexchange.com/questions/1/translation-questions/… –  Joubarc Aug 19 '11 at 13:30
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I don't have any issue with this question's topicality. ;-) –  Jez Aug 19 '11 at 13:45
    
I Didn't think much people would, but it doesn't hurt to check. (This comment belongs to meta. I slap myself on the head for it.) –  Joubarc Aug 19 '11 at 13:51
2  
Could you explain what the Dutch proverb means in English or French? Some of your proposals may work, but I don't understand the Dutch text, so I don't know if they are good translations. –  Gilles Aug 19 '11 at 13:56
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A rough French translation: "Honneur à qui honneur revient". "Credit where due" would porbably be the best in English. –  Joubarc Aug 19 '11 at 14:07
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1 Answer

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I would say that rendre à César ce qui appartient à César is the most widely used, before à tout seigneur tout honneur. Both are still rather formal.

As for the role of Cesar in this saying, it is a reference to Mat, XXII, 21

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