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While in a conversation with my mates, I came across some expression with “six boulots”. I was pretty sure that they were not talking about six jobs and just like my previous queries I am well above 90% that I heard it right. I couldn't interpret the whole sentence but it was like having “six boulots” or something similar!

This is one of the many instances I come across, words like these either I completely forget it or sometimes google has an answer and the rest are in the FSE database :-) .

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On the TLFi website, you can look up words by pronunciation. This is the same dictionary (the *Trésor de la langue française‌​) as www.cnrtl.fr/definition/ , with opaque URLs but with this extra search capability. –  Gilles Sep 28 '12 at 17:57
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You've heard ciboulot, which originally is the name of a small onion. It's sometimes used figuratively for “head” or “brain” in popular language.

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I concur. "Six boulots" doesn't mean anything particular, "ciboulot" is the most plausible hypothesis. –  Eusebius Sep 30 '12 at 12:47
    
Yes , I am now sure that it was ciboulot taking the context into consideration .The subject in reality was a dude who finished his coding part within a few days from the project conception while others were yet to get a grip on the details ! Thanks –  Geekasaur Oct 1 '12 at 10:31
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Six boulots could be six escargots. There is a type of snails that it called boulot. In the U.S sometimes we see it sold in fancy seafoods market and it comes from Canada.

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You mean "bulots", right? It's not the same sound. –  Stéphane Gimenez Dec 2 '12 at 13:42
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