Take the 2-minute tour ×
French Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the French language. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Je lisais cette règle:

In a negative construction, the partitive and indefinite articles (singular and plural) change to de, usually meaning "(not) any":

Considérant cet exemple:

Nous n'avons pas de voiture.

We don't have a car.

Je me demande si c'est acceptable d'écrire:

Nous n'avons pas une voiture.

Est-ce que c'est grammaticalement correct? Cela change-t-il le sens de la phrase?


I read this rule:

In a negative construction, the partitive and indefinite articles (singular and plural) change to de, usually meaning "(not) any":

Considering this example:

Nous n'avons pas de voiture.

We don't have a car.

I wonder whether it's acceptable to write:

Nous n'avons pas une voiture.

Is this gramatically correct? Does it change the meaning of the sentence?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

La règle est juste, et « nous n'avons pas une voiture » ne veut pas dire « we don't have a car ».

C'est certes correct grammaticalement, et employé pour insister sur une : « nous n'avons pas 1 voiture ». Généralement, pour dire « nous en avons quatre ! » ensuite.


The rule is correct, and “nous n'avons pas une voiture” doesn't mean “we don't have a car”.

It is grammatical, though, and used to insist on the numeral “une”:

Nous n'avons pas une voiture !
It's not one car we have!

Generally, one would carry on to say “nous en avons quatre !” (“we have four!”).

share|improve this answer
    
(+1) to balance unjustified difference between our nearly identical answers. (though upsetting Stephane a bit was a point, too, but ...meh ;-) –  Romain VALERI Jan 21 '13 at 18:29
    
Agreed, and strictly speaking the rule remains correct because une is not an indefinite article but a numeral in this case. –  Stéphane Gimenez Jan 21 '13 at 19:02
add comment

En effet, ces deux négations sont différentes :

pas de voiture >>> No car (0 voiture exactement)

pas une voiture >>> Not one car (soit 0 voiture, soit plus d'1) (soit autre chose qu'une voiture)


Indeed, these two negations are different:

pas de voiture >>> No car (zero cars exactly)

pas une voiture >>> Not one car (either zero cars, or more than one, or something other than a car)

share|improve this answer
1  
J'ignore ce qui, dans la réponse de Nikana ou la mienne, a pu motiver un (-1) ... pas de commentaire ? –  Romain VALERI Jan 21 '13 at 16:20
2  
+1 to balance unexplained -1, lol. –  Aerovistae Jan 21 '13 at 17:19
    
+1 to balance hypothetical unjustified balancement -1. Oh wait, because the answer is good too. –  Nikana Reklawyks Jan 21 '13 at 18:23
1  
I really really miss the downvote on comments sometimes... –  Romain VALERI Jan 21 '13 at 18:25
    
@RomainVALERI I struggled with it for a few days but ultimately I just have to ask...which comment do you want to downvote and why?? I feel foolish for asking... –  Aerovistae Jan 25 '13 at 18:27
show 2 more comments

La règle est en effet correcte, mais il y a tout de même un cas où l'on dira pas un (et en effet ça ne se dirait pas avec voiture), c'est lorsqu'on met l'accent sur l'absence de la chose en question, on sous-entend alors Je n'en ai pas un seul, comme dans la formule très commune je n'ai pas un sou, ou pas un rond.


The rule is indeed correct, but all the same there is a case where one would say pas un (and in fact it wouldn't be used with "car"), and that's when one puts the emphasis on the absence of the thing in question, or implies that "I don't have any...", as in the very common je n'ai pas un sou ("I don't have a penny").

share|improve this answer
1  
Je n'ai pas une minute à perdre est aussi un bel exemple. –  Stéphane Gimenez Jan 21 '13 at 17:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.