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In the flashcard app I'm using the native audio pronounces it as "comment TALLEZ vous"...the "comment" runs into the "allez". Is that right? Is there a rule to it? Or can we pronounce it as just comment ALLEZ vous?

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You are looking for liaison rules This is a quasi-duplicate of When to pronounce “s” at the end?. We have to write some sort of general liaison guide. (With links to unstomachable linguistic papers, tee-hee :p) –  Evpok Jul 10 '13 at 14:36
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Ha. Linguistic papers! –  verve Jul 10 '13 at 15:02
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

In that specific case, the -t has to be pronounced, and it would be incorrect not to do so.

As for rules, you could refer to the Wikipedia article. You'll find other references in the different answers to this similar question : When to pronounce "s" at the end?

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Sorry, any other references. Wikipedia has had mistakes in the past and I don't want to start learning wrong things. So, liasions are set in stone right? There are no exceptions? –  verve Jul 10 '13 at 15:01
    
You'll find other sources in the linked question. But I doubt the Wikipedia article could be proven wrong on that particular topic... –  Alexis Pigeon Jul 10 '13 at 15:04
    
I think it's for the vowel "a" that followed by "t". For example in the sentence of "C'est une belle fille.", the "t" in "est" will be pronounced and and stick to the next word. –  Mohsen Gh. Aug 3 '13 at 8:11
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When two vowel sound occur successively one use to add a consonant, a sort of binding, between them to make it more fluently. This is called liasion. In this case the t from comment becomes pronounced.

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