Take the 2-minute tour ×
French Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the French language. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In an interview in Le Monde, I've found:

Le Congrès savait pour Prism, mais n'a rien dit.

Why “pour”? I couldn't find any example of savoir + pour in a couple of dictionaries I checked. Is it correct?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Savoir pour is a colloquialism. Note that this isn't from a newspaper article but from an interview. This construction isn't formal enough for a newspaper article.

Savoir pour translates into English as “know about”: “Congress knew about Prism but didn't tell”. A more formal way to express this in French would be “Le Congrès savait que Prism existait” or “Le Congrès était au courant de l'existence de Prism”. Slightly less informal than savoir pour is être au courant pour (“Le Congrès était au courant pour Prism”), but I still wouldn't use it in a newspaper article.

The preposition pour is used when the description of what is known is elided, leaving only the salient aspect. In contrast, de or que requires a semantically correct qualification of what is known. There are a few cases where there is nothing to elide in the description but in most sentences only one of the prepositions work. This should hopefully be clearer with a few examples.

Le Congrès savait que Prism existait.
Le Congrès était au courant de l'existence de Prism.
Le Congrès savait pour Prism. [« l'existence » is elided]

Je sais pour hier. [I know about the significant event that happened yesterday.]
Je sais ce qu'il s'est passé hier.

— Tu sais pour hier ? — Non, je sais qu'il s'est passé quelque chose mais je ne sais pas quoi.

— Tu es au courant pour la vitre cassée ? — Oui, je sais, c'est le fils du voisin qui a lancé un ballon.
— Tu sais que la vitre est cassée ? — Oui, je sais, c'est le fils du voisin qui a lancé un ballon.

— Tu es au courant pour la vitre cassée ? — Oui, le réparateur est passé ce matin.
— Tu sais que la vitre est réparée ? — Oui, le réparateur est passé ce matin.
— Tu sais que la vitre est cassée ? — Je sais qu'elle était cassée, mais le réparateur est passé ce matin.

Tu était au courant de la promotion de Paul ? [“Did you know that Paul's been promoted?”]
Tu savais pour la promotion de Paul ? [this can mean that Paul was promoted but it can also mean something else related to his promotion, e.g. that it was turned down]
Tu savais que la promotion de Paul avait été acceptée/refusée ?

share|improve this answer
    
Oh ok, thanks. Could I say also "être au courant de qqch" or do I have to use "pour"? –  Ricky Robinson Jul 16 '13 at 12:37
    
Etre au courant de quelque chose peut tout à fait être utilisé : Le Congrès était au courant des implications de Prism. –  Shlublu Jul 16 '13 at 12:41
    
@RickyRobinson There's a distinction in meaning, see my edit. –  Gilles Jul 16 '13 at 12:55

Savait pour, in this context, means knew about:

The Congress knew about Prism, but did not tell.

I am not sure whether this is absolutely correct but this is widely used and admitted as such.
Another (and more formal) way to say this in French would be:

Le Congrès avait connaissance du programme Prism, mais n'a rien dit.

or

Le Congrès savait ce en quoi Prism consistait, mais n'a rien dit.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.