Take the 2-minute tour ×
French Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the French language. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been going through examples in a French grammar workbook, and I saw this example sentence:

J'ignore ce à quoi il s'abonne.

But then I also saw this:

Je ne sais pas à quoi il pense.

These seem to be identical use cases to me. Why does one use ce à quoi and the other only à quoi ?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In object position “ce à quoi …” stands for a direct object (in the main clause) described by means of a relative subordination clause (in which it is an indirect object). Compare (grammatically):

J'ignore ce à quoi il s'abonne.
J'ignore ses raisons.
J'ignore ce qui t'amuse.
J'ignore ce dont il parle.
J'ignore ce que tu fais.

A direct “à quoi…” is used when the verb is followed by an indirect interogative clause. Compare:

Je ne sais pas à quoi il pense.
Je ne sais pas combien il y a de jours dans l'année.
J'ignore à quoi il s'abonne.
J'ignore quel age il a.

What follows the verb can be used as a standalone question:

À quoi pense-t-il ?
Combien y a-t-il de jours dans l'année ?
À quoi s'abonne-t-il ?
Quel age a-t-il ?


Note: Savoir followed by an object which is not an indirect interrogative or an infinitive clause is rare in modern French (example: Je ne sais pas la Physique.). Therefore, I would avoid writing “je ne sais pas ce à quoi”. But notice that

Je ne sais pas ce que tu lis.
Je ne sais pas ce qui le dérange.

are perfectly fine, ce que and ce qui can as well introduce a indirect interrogative clause in which the direct object, respectively the subject, is unknown (and isn't a person). The associated questions are:

Qu'est-ce que tu lis ? (or… Que lis-tu ?)
Qu'est-ce qui le dérange ? (no alternative, qui is only used for persons)

Yes French is weird sometimes.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh my god this is really hard for me to follow grammatically. Too early in the morning right now. –  Aerovistae Sep 13 '13 at 15:18
    
I've added some more. Might or might not make it easier to digest… –  Stéphane Gimenez Sep 13 '13 at 18:44
add comment
  • J'ignore ce à quoi il s'abonne.
  • Je ne sais pas à quoi il pense.

Le ce ajoute de la précision, à l'objet quoi, et cela induit un contexte.

On peut reformuler la première phrase en remplaçant le ce:

  • J'ignore précisément à quoi il s'abonne (sous-entendu : mais je sais qu'il s'abonne à quelque chose).

et contextualiser la seconde :

  • Je ne sais pas à quoi il pense, et je n'en ai aucune idée.
  • Je ne sais pas ce à quoi il pense, mais je devine que cela doit être pénible.

Complément : Le site d'exercice donne l'utilisation pratique des pronoms relatifs dont ce à quoi.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It only looks like a difference of verbosity to me, possibly coming from a matter of taste, but I have no reference to support this.

The following usage sounds fine with me (also the second one sounds heavy):

J'ignore à quoi il pense.

Je ne sais pas ce à quoi il pense.

Interestingly, in this different example, one cannot use "ce" anymore:

J'ignore à quelle heure il part.

Je ne sais pas à quelle heure il part.

share|improve this answer
1  
Je ne sais pas ce à quoi il pense sounds a bit odd to me. We rarely use savoir quelque chose where quelque chose stands for something (like ses pensées). It's too old fashioned, and doesn't even fit in this context. –  Stéphane Gimenez Sep 13 '13 at 9:02
    
I agree it sounds heavy, but I think it is still valid: "Je ne m'intéresse qu'à la langue. Tu sais cela." It's a bit hard to tell as usage in spoken language tends to be flexible ("Tu sais quoi ?"). –  Julien Guertault Sep 13 '13 at 9:41
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.