3
votes
2answers
256 views

When does one use “à” versus “de” before the infinitive of a verb?

I'm having a hard time choosing between "à" and "de" before a verb. I've seen "Je serais heureux de continuer" and "Je serais heureux à continuer", and I don't know if they're both correct, one is ...
-1
votes
2answers
80 views

Écrit-on « sans rien trouvé » ou « sans rien trouver » ?

Dans la phrase suivante : Nous avons fouillé le hangar. Sans rien trouvé. Est-ce que « trouvé » s'écrit « é » ou « er » ?
1
vote
1answer
282 views

When to use “de” before a verb in infinitive form?

Which of this is correct? Est-ce que tu aimes aller au théâtre? Est-ce que tu aimes d'aller au théâtre?
8
votes
1answer
2k views

Quelle est la différence entre « penser à », « penser de », et « penser + infinitif »

Quelle est la différence entre ces trois utilisations du verbe penser? penser + de penser + à penser + verbe (infinitif) Si c'est possible, j’apprécierais des exemples.
4
votes
2answers
719 views

When to use “pour” and the infinitive or just the infinitive?

I definitely learned this, but I forgot. When you say something like "He is going to do the laundry" you would say "Il va faire", but what if you said something like: Est-ce qu'elle a utilisé la ...
9
votes
2answers
316 views

'À avoir eu' : what kind of form is this?

I have seen one form of using avoir, recently, like this: à avoir eu. I forgot the phrase itself, but, for example in this phrase I just found in Google: Les jeunes de l’OM sont 2 sur 14 à avoir ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

When would one use “à” before a verb?

When learning French, I was taught that an infinitive form, e.g. jouer, meant “to play” (or whatever). That is, the English translation of the verb was preceded by to. The word à also means “to.” But ...