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2
votes
1answer
34 views

What is rule of saying using de after “Le prix de la salade de tomates…”

Generally with food we use du, de la, de l' and des according to the Gender and Number. In this case is, de+la=de la, or is it simply de+ la salade de tomates? What I mean to ask is that whether the ...
0
votes
4answers
85 views

“On y trouve de tout”?

I heard this said by a native speaker, translated in subtitles as "We can find anything there." (With reference to shopping in Reims.) I have not seen trouver de qch before. I would have thought this ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

Partitive before adjective?

I'm having a hard time finding a definitive reference for a simple question: how do partitive articles behave before adjectives? Most resources mention that des becomes de, but it's unclear to me what ...
1
vote
3answers
137 views

“C'est du mauvais français” du vs de ?

Another user pointed out some poor phrasing in a French sentence I had linked to by saying "C'est du mauvais français." I am not sure why this uses du rather than de; my impression was that the ...
5
votes
3answers
236 views

C'est du piment rouge or C'est un piment rouge?

The other day I was reading a French comic when I noticed one of the characters said this: Vous mentez! C'est du piment rouge! Note the use of the partitive. This strikes me as a little odd, ...
4
votes
1answer
404 views

Why is “de l'eau” changed to “d'eau” in the negative sentence?

Les garçons ont de l'eau. (The boys have [some] water) Les garçons n'ont pas d'eau. (The boys do not have water) Here are the things I am aware of: I have read this answer de la has been ...
4
votes
3answers
126 views

L'utilisation du partitif dans la phrase « J'aurais trouvé du travail » ?

Si j'étais rentré en France, j'aurais trouvé du travail. Pourquoi on utilise le partitif et pas un article indéfini? Est-ce que la phrase « J'aurais trouvé un travail » est correcte quand même ? ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

The use of the “en” pronoun

My French teacher taught me that when you are asked to replace any noun followed by “de”, always use the personal pronoun “en”. However, I presumed that she was always referring to any noun followed ...
2
votes
1answer
109 views

How to use partitive articles following possessive adjectives?

For instance, how would I translate the following sentence? Where is my water? And I mean specifically using eau, not cheating by using mon verre. Would it be Où est mon eau? or Où est mon ...
8
votes
1answer
243 views

Quelles expériences s'utilisent sans l'article partitif ?

Il y a des fois où, pour la description d'une expérience ou émotion, on n'utilise pas l'article partitif, par exemple: J'ai peur. J'ai chaud. Alors, j'ai été surpris quand j'ai vu J'ai ...
4
votes
2answers
335 views

L'article partitif après « besoin »

On dit j'ai besoin de fruits mais je mange des fruits. Je pense qu'on pourrait dire j'ai besoin des fruits si et seulement si il y a des fruits particuliers dont on a besoin, mais ...
3
votes
3answers
334 views

Are “de la bière” and “de bière” both acceptable?

Are the following sentences both correct? Je donne de la bière à Jean; Je donne de bière à Jean.
1
vote
2answers
221 views

L'article partitif dans des phrases négatives

Ce qui suit est issu de la page 20 de Schaum's Outline of French Grammar de Mary Crocker : Normally, in negative sentences, the partitive article is replaced by de... Note that de becomes d’ ...
1
vote
2answers
315 views

Usage of “de” that is before an adjective [duplicate]

Why do you have to include de before nombreux? Is it because the adjective requires a preposition? What is the grammatical reason for putting de before nombreux? Pour de nombreux Américains, la ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

La difference entre « j'aime le fromage » et « j'aime du fromage »

La phrase « I like cheese » se traduit « j'aime le fromage » et « J'aime du fromage ». Quelle est la différence ?
2
votes
3answers
563 views

« Parler de » + un article partitif ou l'article indéfini « des » ?

Je veux exprimer la notion anglaise : It talks about French tax evasion. (où « it » est un documentaire) En la traduisant, je suis arrivé à : Il parle de des évasions fiscale des française. ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Does “je bois du café” make correct use of partitives?

I would like to know how to say in French "I drink coffee" in a general meaning I'm thinking about "je bois du café", is it right? I have some doubts using the partitifs.
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Does “il y en a” always mean “there is / are some”? Does “il n'y en a pas” always mean “there isn't / aren't any”?

Do these constructions have a standardized way of being translated into English, or can their translation vary based on context? More details: I have noticed that these constructions are usually ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

The partitive articles in negative sentences

In this sentence “de” is an article partitif: Il ne boit pas de café au petit déjeuner. Why? Is there any préposition de négation generally? Update: In negations “ne … plus”, “ne … jamais”, ...
23
votes
1answer
26k views

Usage of “d'eau” vs “de l'eau”

I'm confused about when to use “d'eau” and when to use “de l'eau”. For example, if someone asks “what is in that carafe?”, I think it is correct to answer “c'est de l'eau”. But if you ask for a carafe ...