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18

This may sound obvious, but avoid translated movies/series — pick ones which are natively in French. There aren't so many French series, though. A list of French television series is maintained on Wikipedia. I'd probably recommend starting with animated series. Being targeted at children, the language may be easier. The "Once upon a time..." (Il était une ...


16

For understanding I suggest (besides the obvious time spent listening) to listen specifically to children's audio books and to "bad" movies. The reason is that in these settings there are over-emphasized phrases that are "over-pronounced" and this is one of the ways to actually get your auditory brain to decide what kind of new sounds are important before ...


15

Not exactly a series per se, but I found "Qui veut gagner des millions?" to be very interesting to watch to improve my own French. The questions (and answers) are comparable to the English version, with say 50% being cultural (which I mostly hadn't a clue on, but learned a lot from) and 50% being general knowledge (which I knew or could guess at in English), ...


10

One advice: read introduction books/resources in Spanish and in English. After the introduction phase I don't think it makes much of a difference. (Assuming you are fluent enough in Spanish.) Example: Learning German pronunciation from the point of view of a French speaker is easier when explained from French than from English. But basic German vocabulary ...


10

Je suis dans la situation inverse, celle de l'étudiant, et voici quelques remarques et retours d'expérience que je peux faire. Dans tous les cas, pour apprendre, les techniques de Spaced Repetition sont les meilleures. Elles peuvent très bien être faites avec des fiches en carton. Lire un roman : Facilité, Temps et pronoms Je ne pense pas que lire un ...


9

I already tried Rosetta Stone, for a short time (so my review could be not exactly the best), also a lot of methods for learning languages. And I get very impressed when I see people talking about it. Here are my thoughts about Rosetta Stone software: The learning system is repetitive. (this is the principle of it, but it didn't work for me) Images and ...


9

I have been teaching myself French for a couple of years now, so I can give some advice from experience. I started with fundamentals: noun genders + le, la, les, un, une oui – non – peut-être pronouns: il, elle, ils, elles, tu, je, vous, nous, difference between tu and vous definition of infinitive tense, make sure that basic concept is understood. être, ...


8

As you have noted, the most common way of doing it is to use suffixes, which sometimes indicate what gender nouns will have. You can easily find lists (with Google) such as this one which will give you suffixes and what gender they typically indicate. This second one actually includes the accuracy for each suffix, i.e. the percentage of exceptional cases. ...


8

This may be off-topic (downvote if you think so!) but I think books are just as useful for learning a language as movies, if not more so. I especially recommend the Harry Potter series, for the following reasons: It was written for children, so it's fairly easy to understand, especially the first two books. It's very long (the English version is about ...


8

Une question à peu près similaire a déjà été posée. Le site le Point du FLE peut être utile. Tu peux aussi te servir d'une méthode d'enseignement du FLE pour adultes


7

Tu auras du mal à trouver des manuels scolaires directement téléchargeables à cause des problèmes de copyright. Mais tu pourras peut-être trouver quelque chose qui t'intéresse à partir du portail FLE (Français Langue Étrangère) Le Point du FLE. Dans la rubrique activités il y a de nombreuses adresses probablement intéressantes. J'ai repéré ces deux là : ...


7

I'd strongly suggest finding a local group that speaks French socially, and going along! Meetup.com is a good way to do this, but it isn't the only way to find groups. (It just so happens to be very strong on French language groups near where I live, which is why I know about it). Once you've located a nearby group that welcomes people at your level, go ...


6

Good luck with that. I'm assuming you mean the passé simple and the subjunctive imperfect (though the latter shows up so infrequently it's not a worry). I do not know of any way to specifically find such material. AFAIK only a few quirky writers or translators write in the passé composé (I have read a LOT of books and only ever seen one, though the ...


5

Essayez de ne pas rester seuls, trouvez d'autres francophones avec qui discuter, dans une ambiance détendue. On ne le dira jamais assez, rien de tel que l'immersion pour apprendre une langue. Je salue d'ailleurs vos cours uniquement en français. Si tu désires un livre pour enfants avec beaucoup de vocabulaire, je te recommande Histoire à toutes les sauces. ...


5

Il me semble que la meilleure méthode consiste à lire du français quotidiennement. La lecture apporte une intuition grammaticale et linguistique irremplaçable, permet de rencontrer de nombreux idiomes, renforce le vocabulaire, c'est on ne peut plus précieux. Pour "personnaliser" le résultat, tu pourras souhaiter d'orienter le choix de tes lectures, soit ...


5

Comedy in French quite often rely on play of words, regional / foreign accents and idiosyncracies, or pre-conceived ideas tightly linked to the French culture. This is definitely not the easiest way to learn the language. However, if you are a motivated beginner, you can look for sketches by Raymond Devos, Pierre Desproges or Daniel Prévost, which in my ...


5

Having lived in France for a few years, I myself spoke well enough to live there happily, play for a local football team, run a business and have French friends. My partner at the time however did not. She only had a very limited French vocabulary and had no idea how to string a sentence together. You say me where bakery. Bakery where? Where is the bakery? ...


5

Here are some observations while learning French. The French spoken by native French is very fast. For beginners its very hard to catch up. Also the pronunciation is not always clear or sometimes there is no distinction between two words. As our brain is not trained yet for these sound patterns, for beginners its hard to understand. For beginners, I would ...


4

You have the choice between the rival compact dictionaries Petit Larousse and Petit Robert. I prefer the Petit Larousse since it is far more precise, and its famous "pink pages" contain common expressions, Latin phrases used in French, proverbs etc. Both Larousse and Robert have good conjugation and grammar sections. However, my preferred dictionaries are: ...


4

To improve your vocabulary, I warmly recommend the free anki software. It help you review your vocabulary daily in way that aims at optimality regarding time spent versus number of words actually learnt, that is words that you will remember more than a few days or weeks. Peruse the website for explanation about its philosophy. it might seems a bit elaborated ...


4

"Plus belle la vie" is quite easy to follow. However, while it deals about everyday life, it is not about real life in Marseille, there are not that many murders there. :)


4

Quand j'avais enseigné le français à ma femme qui parle maintenant très bien (elle a aussi reçu des cours depuis), je voulais qu'elle puisse rapidement faire des phrases et communiquer, et je voulais qu'elle parle comme tout le monde, pas de façon trop académique. Au tout début, on avait commencé par: La prononciation et les règles de lectures à fond. le ...


4

If you're fairly new to French, then I'd suggest you try watching easier French films with English subtitles on them. You want something that doesn't have a lot of slang (argot) in them. Comedy films often work well, as do quite a few RomComs. There are loads of films in this category that you can watch, so your easiest way is probably just to watch out for ...


4

In big cities in France, you can take lessons at L'Alliance française. Many foreigner friends of mine found that this is a great experience, not only because of the high quality of lessons but also because of the social events with all the students and french as the only common language.


4

For a native English speaker with no previous French experience and limited time, I would recommend dividing one's efforts between reading a phrasebook, for vocabulary, and using Duolingo, for general familiarity with the language, its grammar and its constructs.


4

I recommend you "Ma france" series by BBC. It's really a wonderful training programme. Visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french/mafrance/


4

@citizen: That's a great question... The only book that I have been able to find that matches your description, is a book called "Easy French Reader," by R. de Roussy de Sales (ISBN 978-0-07-142848-4). The book starts off with "easy" stories, and the level of difficulty progresses with each chapter. There is a small glossary, and on average about three of ...


4

I've never been in a position to try this myself, but one thing you could do is go talk to elderly people. They are often bored and will be grateful for some human interaction and conversation even if it's with a foreigner who can't speak very well. Just go to wherever they hang out, or go to an old folks' home. Elderly people love telling stories.


3

I really like Pimsleur, a series of audio-only lessons which you can generally find for free at your library. Another option (more similar to Rosetta Stone vocab drills) is Memrise.



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