Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Jumping to exclamations like your examples #2 and #3, where you want include the notion of “you don’t know how/to what point …,” I’d used: “Tu [ne] peux pas savoir/imaginer … comme (ou à quel point) … (#2)il peut devenir serieux/(#3)il peut poser des problèmes!/il peut foutre le bordel!” Back to #1, I’d say “Qu’il fait beau!” or « Qu’est-ce qu’il fait ...


4

Well, I'd first answer your side question: you have to shorten it. Que il is not correct. You have to use Qu'il. So let me correct your different sentences: Qu'il fait beau aujourd'hui ! Tu ne sais pas à quel point il peut devenir sérieux. Tu ne peux pas imaginer le chaos* qu'il peut causer. Quel beau voyage ! *I am not very sure of the meaning of ...


6

Main question Actually, most of the examples you gave translate almost as is. How beautiful today is ! Qu'il fait beau aujourd'hui ! You don't know how serious he can become. Tu ne sais pas à quel point il peut être/devenir sérieux. You can't imagine how much havoc he can cause. Tu n'imagines pas les dégâts qu'il peut causer. ...


2

Je traduirais par: Qu'il fait beau aujourd'hui ! Tu ne sais pas à quel point il peut devenir sérieux. Tu n'imagines pas tous les ravages qu'il peut provoquer. Quel bon voyage !


3

Your understanding of the grammatical rule is correct, but in a practical context, it doesn't necessarily apply. Many adjectives nowadays (due to the constant evolution of the French language) can have either meaning when placed after the noun. "Une colonie de fourmis importante" could be important or large depending on context, but "une importante colonie ...


4

This rule only applies to attributive adjectives (adjectifs épithètes), i.e. when they are directly attached to the noun they modify. It does not apply to predicative adjectives (adjectifs attributs du sujet) like your example ("Il" is separated of [adjective] by "est"). In this case, you extract the sense of an adjective with the use of context. Example ...



Top 50 recent answers are included