Hot answers tagged

18

If you want to use a present simple as in English, you use "passer", like "Je passe un examen", "tu passes un examen",... But if you want to use a present Be+ing, you should use "être en train de", like "Je suis en train de passer un examen", "tu es en train de passer un examen", etc... We use "être en train de" to describe an action that is happening. I ...


15

"Je passe un examen" is a correct form. "je suis passer..." is wrong. You can say "je vais passer un examen" to mean "I'm going to take an exam" or "j'ai passé un examen" to mean "I have taken an exam".


14

Be+ing present is often translated with "en train de + verbe" structure, however it is a more heavy construction than it is in English, so it is not used when not necessary. For example: Que fais-tu ? - Je révise pour mon examen. Would be translated by: What are you doing ? - I'm rewiewing for my exam. And if your mom was calling you in the ...


5

French has one present tense only. English has two (present simple and present continuous). Depending on context, the English present and present continuous always translate to the French present tense. There are some exceptions where one might use en train de, but there is no hard and fixed rule for this. I speak French every Tuesday at school = Je parle ...


4

You can use "grandir" (to grow): Les enfants sont toujours impatients de grandir, de pouvoir se coucher tard et conduire une voiture. Of course it is more vague than the English "to grow up", but the precision will have to be given by the context.


3

They do not mean at all the same thing. Saisissez is a conjugated form of saisir which has a lot of meanings like grasp, grab, enter, while clé is a noun, not a verb, meaning key but not the kind of keys used on a keyboard which are named touches.


3

If the context makes it clear that you are not talking about a habit but about something you were doing in a precise instant, you use the imparfait: I was having a good time -> Je passais un bon moment. This morning I was having a drink when... -> Ce matin, je buvais (une boisson), quand... (as "boire" contains already the idea of drinking, you ...


3

Je passe un examen Is right. Others mentioned: Je suis en examen That is also right. I want to add the simpler form: J'ai un examen That is the most popular use in spoken French and will be followed by a time indication, for example: J'ai un examen ce soir (I'm taking an exam tonight)


3

-ing indique une action en train de se dérouler ou qui dure. L'équivalent en français est bien le participe présent: forme des verbes finissant par ant. Toutefois, cette forme est assez lourde, et il faut éviter de trop l'utiliser (mais elle est totalement correcte). Le premier exemple est correct. On peut aussi simplement dire: Vous et moi, qui avons ...


2

"much" and "a lot" could be translated into "trop", "beaucoup", or "autant". I have studied a lot. J'ai beaucoup étudié. I do not have much time. Je n'ai pas trop de temps. Why don't many people know the philology ? Pourquoi autant de monde ne connait pas la philologie ?


2

«D'être mal compris» Is "to be misunderstood". Voir le verbe comprendre II.2.a


1

Would you is equal to Voudrais-vous exactly, because the you personal pronoun is vous in French.


1

To answer the question in your title and given the context of the situation you are describing, the appropriate translation of "misunderstood" is "mal interprété". As for your sentence, on way to go would be, for example: Les communications écrites, contrairement aux communications orales, peuvent être facilement mal interprétées et sont susceptibles ...


1

Les deux expressions sont synonymes mais pas toujours interchangeables. « De nature » précède le qualificatif (ex: « de nature internationale » mais pas « internationale de nature ») alors que « par nature » peut être placé avant, après ou en apposition (« Étant, par nature, une école internationale, ... »). C'est cette dernière forme qui me semble la plus ...


1

There are several ways to translate that, but usually in French the "at -ing" form will be translated by a preposition and a noun. "good" will be translated by "bon" or synonyms like "doué", "fort"... He is good at playing the piano. -> Il est doué au piano. If you want to use a verb you can use the following form, with the adverb "bien": Il joue ...


1

This is a kind of sentence which is hard to translate easily from english. For instance, your examples would become: Il est doué au piano Il est doué pour jouer du piano Ils sont bons en cuisine Elle est mauvaise à la guitare On n'est pas doué pour étudier Here, you may use « doué » and « bon », but on an oral conversion, you will often hear « ...


1

Using “with” or “without” in this fashion in English is just a way to bypass a conditional. The most likely way this would be expressed in French is by using explicit conditionals. Je ne peux pas faire ça si tu meurs. [I can't do it with you(r) dying.] Je ne peux pas faire ça si tu ne m'aides pas. [I can't do it without you(r) helping.]


1

"alors que" can do it too: Je ne peux pas faire ça alors que tu es en train de mourir. which means you can't do it because the guy you are talking to is dying. The negative form: Je ne peux pas faire ça alors que tu n'es pas en train de mourir. means that you need the guy you are talking to to be dying so you can do your stuff. If you use ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible