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6

In French there is no notion as strong as the English uncountable nature of certain things. If you can think about a way to count something, you can speak about it as a countable. For example, you can separate information in pieces of information, and it makes it countable: in French you say "une information" for "a piece of information". Same goes for ...


3

Anne has a nice, elaborate description, but these type of classifications (count vs. noncount, but also genders, alienable vs. inalienable possession, regular vs. irregular, count words, deponency etc.) really come down, ultimately, to arbitrariness. Yes, there may be historical factors (although this just pushes the question to the parent languages), but ...


3

That would be: Ce n'est pas un chien; de chien would be used in il n'y a pas de chien (there is no dog), du chien in the dubious ce n'est pas du chien (that's not dog). Standard French would be Ce n'est pas une chose étrange (chose is a regular sustantive). Poetical/literary might be Ce n'est pas chose étrange (chose is used here as an invariable word). See ...



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