Hot answers tagged

6

The verb "manquer" can be used with "de" as described in the page you quote. [Quelqu'un] manque de [quelque chose] "courage", "résolution", "mémoire", "vivres" , etc. refer to uncountable notions or undefined amounts of countable things, as you could say "some courage" or "some money" in English. So you don't have to add an article between "de" and ...


3

"le/la/les" are definite articles in French. So if you want to translate it, you must put that notion in your translation. The plural form is often used to design a group of people, "les puissants" meaning the group of people who have the power. What kind of power exactly depends of the context. In the same way "les riches, les pauvres" refers to the rich ...


3

In these sort of construction, the article will often reappear if the noun has an accompanying article (as pointed out by guillaume) or preposition phrase. However, since many manquer de+noun combinations are partially set phrases, this is an uncommon instance. The more set a phrase is, the harder it is to construct it with an article (manquer des occasions ...


3

The PDF article* linked in hunter's comments to the question was right on point. It considers three hypotheses on the origin of French partitives. I will just mention them here so other members can form an idea ahead of reading the article itself. The Deleted Quantifier Hypothesis: According to this, French partitives derive from a form consisting of: ...


2

The correct usage would be "C'est du mauvais français", not "de". "français" is here used as something quantifiable and definite (de le => du français, de la langue française, des mots en français, that you can touch and split like du pain), not something abstract like an adverb describing a manner (e.g. c'est de bonne heure = it's early, c'est de bonne ...


2

All phrases are OK. 1A, 2A are the most common and are equivalent: dans une chose pareille. dans des choses pareilles. 2B also exists, but is more stylish: dans de pareilles choses. 1B is correct but rare: dans une pareille chose.


1

Les deux sont utilisables: un des / l'un des , une des, l'une des Il y a deux notions: un des = un parmi plusieurs l' (le) = celui-ci justement Grevisse, relayé par Etudes littéraires : Dans une construction avec « l’un », un a une valeur de pronom que le « l’ », toujours facultatif, peut renforcer. Le L’ de l’un a une vocation euphonique (et ...


1

Yes, 1A in plural becomes 2A, 1B in plural becomes 2B. So yes, but you may want to put the adjective first, as shown in the Bs, to emphasize the description aspect.


1

For words that there's no way to measure the amount like love, water, patience , etc or in other words that you can't divide will require "de, du or de la" De: will be used for masculine nouns If you have a masculine noun + le: you'll have to use "de l'" if the next word starts with a vowel In case you have a feminine noun you'll use "de la" or "de l'" (for ...


1

Yes, you can do this and yes it means, in effect, the person with that quality. Similar to nicknaming someone "Ginger" or "Shorty". The grammatical term to describe this in french is a nominalized adjective or, alternatively, substantive adjective. The latter seems to be less used presently. L'adjectif substantif can be defined as «un adjectif qui ...


1

It's a rule in French, the construct "de le" doesn't exist and is replaced by "du". As opposed to the feminine for which it is "de la". Je mange de la glace. I eat ice cream Je mange du pain I eat bread Je me souviens de la mer. I remember the sea Je parle du français. I'm talking about French



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible