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15

This may sound obvious, but avoid translated movies/series — pick ones which are natively in French. There aren't so many French series, though. A list of French television series is maintained on Wikipedia. I'd probably recommend starting with animated series. Being targeted at children, the language may be easier. The "Once upon a time..." (Il était une ...


14

Not exactly a series per se, but I found "Qui veut gagner des millions?" to be very interesting to watch to improve my own French. The questions (and answers) are comparable to the English version, with say 50% being cultural (which I mostly hadn't a clue on, but learned a lot from) and 50% being general knowledge (which I knew or could guess at in English), ...


8

This may be off-topic (downvote if you think so!) but I think books are just as useful for learning a language as movies, if not more so. I especially recommend the Harry Potter series, for the following reasons: It was written for children, so it's fairly easy to understand, especially the first two books. It's very long (the English version is about ...


7

I don't think the case you describe is a translation to begin with. When translating a work of art for a different speaking country than the author's, yes, we would have an attempt of translation, good or bad. Here, in the case of a commercial product, the choice of the foreign version's title has almost nothing to do with the purpose of being faithful to ...


5

While I was on it, I looked more generally: In France, using English expressions is so "hype". 7 examples of titles "translation" remaining in english (more examples among the comments) 15 titres de films en anglais traduits … en anglais – topito In Quebec, French is serious business so they always translate the title, even if it doesn't mean ...


5

In French, the phrase bad trip is used to describe a bad experience as a consequence of the consumption of drugs or alcohol. Gueule de bois doesn't imply any negative connotation over what happened the night before, and only relates to alcohol, not drugs in general. According to the French article in Wikipedia, the title was inspired by another movie with a ...


5

Here are some observations while learning French. The French spoken by native French is very fast. For beginners its very hard to catch up. Also the pronunciation is not always clear or sometimes there is no distinction between two words. As our brain is not trained yet for these sound patterns, for beginners its hard to understand. For beginners, I would ...


4

Doudou can also be a term of endearment applied to a human being. In the sense of an adult loved one, according to the Petit Robert and the Trésor de la langue française, it's only used in the Antilles. It can also be used by a parent to refer to their young child (the child is the parent's comfort object?). I can't find a dictionary that mentions this ...


4

If you're fairly new to French, then I'd suggest you try watching easier French films with English subtitles on them. You want something that doesn't have a lot of slang (argot) in them. Comedy films often work well, as do quite a few RomComs. There are loads of films in this category that you can watch, so your easiest way is probably just to watch out for ...


4

I recommend you "Ma france" series by BBC. It's really a wonderful training programme. Visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french/mafrance/


4

"Plus belle la vie" is quite easy to follow. However, while it deals about everyday life, it is not about real life in Marseille, there are not that many murders there. :)


3

If you like humor you can watch "Kaamelot" ou "Caméra Café", but I think it's a bit complicated to understand for a novice.


2

I do not know of a dedicated subtitle site with more subtitles available than opensubtitles. My method is using VLC (not above 2.0.9, or the unstable 2.2 or above), and the add-on called VLSub (look there also for the VLC versions that work) which can easily search and download subtitles from this site. Clicking "Show config" you can then set the ...


2

Actually, about anything that airs on French TV has captions for the deaf and hard of hearing, by law . However, I've never seen them available for download anywhere. To make matters worse, French DVDs practically never over French subtitles. The few French subtitles you'll find online are generally of poor quality and don't match the text very well. The ...


1

You can find subtitles on website such as this one : www.opensubtitles.org You will find subtitles for movies, TV series, ... Don't forget to use language filter to avoid subtitles in other languages.


1

I like to use the TV5 app in my mobile. It has a lot of videos in native French, most with the option to use subtitles and they are updated very often.



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