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8

The problem here is that this usage of "like" is very common in English, but has no exact equivalent in French. It is mostly heard, rather than read, because it expresses something different according to the oral context. I believe that "It's like two miles from here" is slightly different from "It's about two miles from here". In the first sentence, ...


7

You could say "genre" in french slang : "c'est genre à 2 miles d'ici" or "j'ai mangé genre 5 livres de viandes". It would fit with the original sense you mean. Note that in France, we would say "kilometres" instead of "miles" and "kilos" instead of "pounds".


6

I understand your question and I would say that where I live, in Québec(french-Canada), it would be translated as the following : «C'est genre à deux miles d'ici.» or «C'est comme à deux miles d'ici.» «J'en ai mangé genre 5 livres.» But this is really really much local in Abitibi-Témiscamingue and only millennials talks this manner. The word "genre" is a new ...


6

Il y a deux sens pour Truculent : Le sens vieilli (exprimé en A) qui correspond au sens que l'anglais conserve. On remplace ce mot maintenant par terrible, farouche L'évolution contemporaine (exprimé en B, connue dès 1872 [haut en couleur, qui réjouit par ses excès] est devenue usuelle à partir de 1920). Elle concerne les hommes, les œuvres ou les ...


6

Bien que le vocabulaire soit relativement proche de l'italien, l'espagnol ou du catalan, le français est trop différent en rythme et accent tonique pour qu'il y ait une intercompréhension naturelle suffisante avec les autres langues romanes et pour qu'une conversation productive soit possible. De plus, au contraire des français, les italiens et les espagnols ...


5

I'm not a historian of both French and English typography, but having read quite a bit of French and English literature and knowing a bit of typography in multiple languages, I can tell you that French doesn't need the quotes like English does, as it's obvious from the tenses where one person's conversation begins and ends. The use of the Passé Simple and ...


5

Short answer: no, they don't exist. You have two ways of answering a question : Answer shortly: Oui/D'accord/OK (informal) Non/Pas maintenant/'Peux pas (informal) Use a verb You have to repeat the verb (or use a synonym) just as you did in your example. If you are asked to perform an action, you can also replace it with a "generic" action ...


4

I always thought that what the Mérovingien referred to was the capability of French to string together a whole bunch of swearwords into a single noun phrase(1). THAT is what "rolls off the tongue" rather than anything related to the meaning of the words. You can keep going almost indefinitely. My father can keep stringing them as long as he's got breath ...


4

No, there's nothing inherently special about French profanity. It's just a reference to the fact that many people consider French to be one of the most beautiful languages, and therefore even its "ugly words" are beautiful. a character in Quebec mentions that he finds English profanity distasteful because it centers around bodily functions, implying that ...


4

Comprendre juste en écoutant, non. Lire et a peu près comprendre, oui, l'italien, l'espagnol et le catalan sont assez compréhensibles à cause de la similitude dans les formations des phrases, et les préfixes utilisés, je parle bien sûr de phrases relativement simples, pas d'un texte complexe bien évidemment.


4

[ɛ] is not a diphthong (what you call a "double vowel") it is a mid-open front vowel. On the wiktionary you can listen to the word tête and have the IPA phonetic transcription besides. Moreover for this word you can compare the pronunciation in different types of French, you can see that the word is pronounced with the sound [ɛ] in France and with a ...


3

The comparison to English is the past perfect tense. This is the tense that we use when we're already talking about the past, and we want to describe an event that occured before the time we're talking about. It's always formed with "had + participle," although "had" contracts to 'd in most contexts in spoken English. I told her that I'd done it. Je ...


3

-ing indique une action en train de se dérouler ou qui dure. L'équivalent en français est bien le participe présent: forme des verbes finissant par ant. Toutefois, cette forme est assez lourde, et il faut éviter de trop l'utiliser (mais elle est totalement correcte). Le premier exemple est correct. On peut aussi simplement dire: Vous et moi, qui avons ...


3

La version plus générique existe en tamil : "Andhadhi is a form of poem in Tamil literature, in which the last word of the previous verse forms the starting word of the next verse." Source : description d'un appli gratuit disponsible à Amazon : Kambar - Sadagopar Andhadhi En anglais, elle s'appelle « chain verse » ou bien « chain rhyme » : "A descendant of ...


2

Environ or à peu près are fine translations for like in the first sentence. To state you don't precisely know how far it is, you might also say: C'est peut-être à trois kilomètres d'ici. For the second one, I would say: Ce plat était délicieux, j'ai mangé quelque chose comme deux kilos de viande... Quelque chose comme is also used in the French ...


2

On a dit que la chanson en laisse fait partie de la versification française et a son origine dans la chanson de geste (Moyen-Âge français). « Une laisse est le groupement de plusieurs vers isométriques à assonances ou à rimes identiques en séries de longueur différente dépourvues d'articulation interne » (Traité de versification française des origines à nos ...


2

Swearing in Quebec-French is... special. The words originate from religious artifacts, but nobody in Quebec utters any of these words thinking anything religion-related. Besides nobody says "tabernacle". What's so great about them is that, a bit like the English F-word, any of the Quebec-French swear words can be (and are!) used as nouns, verbs, adverbs ...


1

French should use quotation marks when reporting direct speech. Your example should be written : « N'importe quoi ! répondit François en riant. Les monstres ne vivent pas dans les forêts, ils vivent juste dans notre imagination. » Note the use of double angle quotes with non-breaking spaces. When reporting a dialogue (ie two or more people ...


1

To be like is an informal way of saying to utter/to say (AHDotEL). The word genre (2) is not part of any idiom using the verb être which would yield a similar meaning in French. Être du genre humain for instance, would mean to belong to. The Académie française discusses it indirectly and labels this sort of usage as an "emploi fautif" (incorrect use) : « Il ...


1

They mean the same thing, the only difference is on the language level: genre in this situation, e.g. Il a genre trois ans He's like, three years old is in French pretty informal (maybe in English too, I don't know) This structure doesn't necessarily introduce a citation, but any form of complement (adjective, proposition, noun, and any citation ...


1

In my experience, the two are pretty much exactly the same and can be used interchangeably. They're both just filler words to give the speaker an extra second to think about what he/she is going to say. "I was like, 10 miles from home when..." "J'étais genre, à 10 kilomètres de chez moi lorsque..."


1

Much of what constitues a French accent seems to me the fact that French can simply do away with stress (tonic) accent. To an A-S speaker it sounds as if all the 'words'are being run together. As a young linguistics student many years ago, I heard French phonolgy compared to that of Inuit, a super agglutinative tongue. Given also the high degree of homophony ...


1

Latin is the root that I know of - certainly re 'sinistra/left'. And it's from there that the connotations left=shady and to be suspicious of, or unlucky'. That's why left handed people have had such a bad time over the ages. And that's why don't shake hands with our left hand. Droit comes from the Latin for 'direct' and, in Greek and Latin, their words and ...



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