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3

En quelque sorte, vous voulez savoir pourquoi le grand auteur Franck Ribéry (à moins que ce ne soit un grand footballeur?) a dit: "Le Touquet, c'est une ville que j'aime bien venir". Il semble en effet que dans son cas, il refuse non seulement la nécessité de distinguer si le verbe de la seconde proposition est transitif ou non (le choix entre que et dont ...


1

Whereas aussi as a sentence adverb (adverbe de phrase) indicates that what follows proceeds from what was said as it's virtually included therein, aussi bien detaches what follows and marks it as self-explanatory, says the TLFi. Larousse marks a similar construction, introducing an accessory causal element, as literary; Ac.9 says classical. LBU14 §1034 says ...


2

In that case, "aussi bien" means "besides" but with less opposition (because "aussi bien" literally means "as well").


1

Pour la première question : par sa construction, Non seulement... mais... est une opposition, mais au sens que peut avoir non... mais... dans d'autres usages. "Il faut parler à son interlocuteur non comme à un inférieur ou un supérieur mais comme à un égal". Non ce qui est faux, mais ce qui est vrai. La tournure non seulement... mais... utilise donc le ...


1

A complement. Collins online has the conjunction and provides two use cases, avec valeur d'opposition (opposing value ; yet, but), and introduisant un fait nouveau (a new idea, some novel thing ; now). Larousse Fr-En labels its register as soutenu for whatever reason and provides examples with now/but. For the origin see its etymology (from latin, deriving ...


2

Or en début de phrase pose un argument faisant évoluer l'argumentation énoncé dans la phrase précédente dans une direction inattendue. Dans les exemples cités, il pourrait être remplacé par mais, qui marque une opposition plus marquée, plus frontale, plus évidente. Sur la phrase concernant le voile, la loi doit prendre en compte les femmes qui le porte par ...


3

I think a good English translation could be, "Yet, ...", "Well, ..." or "Now, ...". There is always some sort of comparison to a previous statement. Hence, in your examples, the author is saying that even though the law protects those who wear a veil, supporting them makes you out to be an "islamophobe." Similarly, in the second ...


-3

"Or" is a synonym of "cependant, pourtant, toutefois", which means indeed "However". Of course, i mean "However" not as in "However you want", but "However, I am...". It is not particularly elegant, i would say it is the opposite, and is used too often.


1

Using “with” or “without” in this fashion in English is just a way to bypass a conditional. The most likely way this would be expressed in French is by using explicit conditionals. Je ne peux pas faire ça si tu meurs. [I can't do it with you(r) dying.] Je ne peux pas faire ça si tu ne m'aides pas. [I can't do it without you(r) helping.]


1

"alors que" can do it too: Je ne peux pas faire ça alors que tu es en train de mourir. which means you can't do it because the guy you are talking to is dying. The negative form: Je ne peux pas faire ça alors que tu n'es pas en train de mourir. means that you need the guy you are talking to to be dying so you can do your stuff. If you use ...


0

with you dying. => tandis / pendant que tu meurs. Plus mot à mot : avec toi mourant, avec toi en train de mourir. avec une négation (without), on emploie souvent le subjonctif (hypothétique): without them freaking out. => sans qu'ils deviennent dingues. => sans les rendre dingues.


4

To add up to other answers, another possibility that I would use is Cela dit, il y avait de la nourriture. which can be translated literally as "That being said, there was food", so it tones potential, previous criticism. In spoken language, one could also use Il y avait de la nourriture, cela dit. which is sloppy phrasing, but might match the ...


1

Contrarily to @Dranna, I wouldn't put "pourtant" at the end of a sentence like this. The adverb is most often placed just after the verb. It can be placed at the beginning or the end of the phrase, but then it should be separated with a ",". Il y avait pourtant de la nourriture. Il y avait de la nourriture, pourtant. Pourtant, il y avait de la ...


2

Both places are correct but you're mistranslating the number of food. Don't put a plural when you don't need it. Food is singular, let it stay and translate by : Pourtant, il y avait de la nourriture ? Or : Il avait de la nourriture pourtant ? The place where you put it will depend. If the sentence is within a conversation, the first translation ...



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