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16

For understanding I suggest (besides the obvious time spent listening) to listen specifically to children's audio books and to "bad" movies. The reason is that in these settings there are over-emphasized phrases that are "over-pronounced" and this is one of the ways to actually get your auditory brain to decide what kind of new sounds are important before ...


15

This may sound obvious, but avoid translated movies/series — pick ones which are natively in French. There aren't so many French series, though. A list of French television series is maintained on Wikipedia. I'd probably recommend starting with animated series. Being targeted at children, the language may be easier. The "Once upon a time..." (Il était une ...


14

Not exactly a series per se, but I found "Qui veut gagner des millions?" to be very interesting to watch to improve my own French. The questions (and answers) are comparable to the English version, with say 50% being cultural (which I mostly hadn't a clue on, but learned a lot from) and 50% being general knowledge (which I knew or could guess at in English), ...


10

http://www.memrise.com/ has a French flashcard system for English speakers. I haven't tried the French version, but I find the Mandarin version very good, so I expect the same for French.


8

This may be off-topic (downvote if you think so!) but I think books are just as useful for learning a language as movies, if not more so. I especially recommend the Harry Potter series, for the following reasons: It was written for children, so it's fairly easy to understand, especially the first two books. It's very long (the English version is about ...


7

I'd strongly suggest finding a local group that speaks French socially, and going along! Meetup.com is a good way to do this, but it isn't the only way to find groups. (It just so happens to be very strong on French language groups near where I live, which is why I know about it). Once you've located a nearby group that welcomes people at your level, go ...


6

An excellent free online resource is skype or MSN. You can find language exchange contacts free at http://www.mylanguageexchange.com/ I have made some great French friends chatting face to face on skype (I recommend you use a camera). We've even holidayed with each other. It's a fantastic way to make new friends and improve your French and English (or ...


5

Here are some observations while learning French. The French spoken by native French is very fast. For beginners its very hard to catch up. Also the pronunciation is not always clear or sometimes there is no distinction between two words. As our brain is not trained yet for these sound patterns, for beginners its hard to understand. For beginners, I would ...


5

This answer will be a non-answer: there aren't any. There are resources that will help you learn French, but it's impossible to learn it completely online to the level you described. If you really need or want to learn French, you absolutely must (in decreasing order of preference) move to a French-speaking country, make several French-speaking friends, or ...


4

"Plus belle la vie" is quite easy to follow. However, while it deals about everyday life, it is not about real life in Marseille, there are not that many murders there. :)


4

If you're fairly new to French, then I'd suggest you try watching easier French films with English subtitles on them. You want something that doesn't have a lot of slang (argot) in them. Comedy films often work well, as do quite a few RomComs. There are loads of films in this category that you can watch, so your easiest way is probably just to watch out for ...


4

I would suggest you wikihow and frenchtutorial.com, which should at least help you for your first steps1. But as Brennan Vincent said, you probably won't reach a high level using nothing beside them. 1 I would say mettre le pied à l'étrier in French.


4

In big cities in France, you can take lessons at L'Alliance française. Many foreigner friends of mine found that this is a great experience, not only because of the high quality of lessons but also because of the social events with all the students and french as the only common language.


4

I recommend you "Ma france" series by BBC. It's really a wonderful training programme. Visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french/mafrance/


3

Having lived in France for a few years, I myself spoke well enough to live there happily, play for a local football team, run a business and have French friends. My partner at the time however did not. She only had a very limited French vocabulary and had no idea how to string a sentence together. You say me where bakery. Bakery where? Where is the bakery? ...


3

For a native English speaker with no previous French experience and limited time, I would recommend dividing one's efforts between reading a phrasebook, for vocabulary, and using Duolingo, for general familiarity with the language, its grammar and its constructs.


3

If you like humor you can watch "Kaamelot" ou "Caméra Café", but I think it's a bit complicated to understand for a novice.


3

The coffee break french podcast got me to the point where I was able to understand intermediate material. It is also a nice way to learn during your commute.


3

I've never been in a position to try this myself, but one thing you could do is go talk to elderly people. They are often bored and will be grateful for some human interaction and conversation even if it's with a foreigner who can't speak very well. Just go to wherever they hang out, or go to an old folks' home. Elderly people love telling stories.


2

Le Point du FLE has a very good database of resources listed according to topics and levels. All resources listed are free.


2

Carnegie Mellon University - Open Learning Initiative Here is a link straight to the French Page


2

Well if your friend have extra time on the way to work or whatever I suggest using Rosetta Stones French series, he can have it on his cellphone too, and basically its not so much about grammar since its quite hard for beginners to learn.


2

Memrise is very good for learning vocabulary. You can use other people's lists (including introductory French ones) or create your own. It's essentially a flash card system with sounds/graphics/videos/and mems to help you remember your vocab lists.


2

Duolingo uses crowd sourcing of translations to teach French. There are also a series of lessons that gradually advance on French grammar and vocabulary.


2

Immersion helped my French extremely and attempting to be friends with French. Don't be shy, attempt to talk to everyone. Also, try to learn the tenses for some important verbs. ex. to go aller irai (future, je) je vais aller (near future) I'm going je suis allé (past tense) i went


2

This is maybe not a tool to begin with, but it helps a lot when it comes the time to write a sentence with maybe, some medium skills. When I'm writing a text in french, I usually use this online tool: http://bonpatron.com/en/. It is easy to use and gives you reason of why you made a mistake somewhere. Although I speak French all day long, this tool always ...


2

Il y a une belle liste sur le wikipedia de la littérature française. En ce qui me concerne, je dirai Le Petit Prince et Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, 2 œuvres simples et rapides à lire.


2

Ressources de lecture FLE (Français Langues Étrangère) accessibles gratuitement sur internet. Bonjour de France Voir les sections : - Histoire de la Francophonie (niveau avancé seulement) - Civilisation Française (de débutant à avancé) Polar FLE Une histoire policière accompagnées d'exercices de compréhension qui s'adresse aux personnes qui veulent se ...


1

Le plus simple est de trouver une anthologie : dans un style très scolaire http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagarde_et_Michard qui, malgré tout ce que l'on peut en dire, donne les mille et une facettes littéraires de la francophonie au travers des siècles. Ensuite, les rencontres se font (ou pas) avec les auteurs ; tout bon libraire saura vous orienter selon ...


1

I like to use the TV5 app in my mobile. It has a lot of videos in native French, most with the option to use subtitles and they are updated very often.



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