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11

Un dialecte n'est pas obligatoirement lié au territoire, le terme peut s'appliquer à une façon de parler d'un groupe de gens liés par leur métier, leurs aspirations, etc. Même si le terme de dialecte est parfois employé pour désigner les langues régionales ce n'est pas le terme qu'emploient les linguistes et les politiques qui parlent de langues ...


11

Joubarc is right, you don't actually need to; in fact, many Quebeckers don't use it in formal situations (though I have never met one who does not use it otherwise). Of course, it should never be used in most texts. If you do wish to use it for any reason, this “tu” actually replaces “est-ce que”, but is placed after the conjugated verb. You can use it with ...


5

La base de donnée de l'Ethnologue donne 25 langues pour la France dont 2 éteintes et 2 langues des signes. Le breton est une langue à part du français (c'est une lange celtique et le français une langue romane). Le gallo cité par Laure y est considéré comme un dialecte du français. On y trouve aussi une rapide introduction aux problèmes posés par ...


3

Like Joubarc mentioned, there is no need or convention about this way of speaking. I could maybe compare it to some people saying y'all in English. As far as I know, this construction seems like the amalgamation of the two ways of asking questions in the second person singular: 1- Formal: Verb+subject+object? eg. As-tu un crayon? 2- Informal: ...


3

Wikipedia. It seems to be a recent creole of French and English in use in a specific region of Canada, and totally unknown where I am.


2

It is French from France. Here are some indications that I picked up on: 0:16 "Je suis là, Louise" This sentence, which means "I am here, Louise" is more often used in France than it is in Canada. In the Acadian variety of French you are more likely to hear "Je suis ici" which will sound like 'ih-SIT'. It is also not uncommon to hear "Je suis ici" ...


1

As far as Spanish is concerned, it seems you are referring to the way the letters 'c' and 'z' are pronounced compared to the 's' letter depending on the region. Catalan people speaking Spanish are following the standard usage to pronounce the formers like the Engligh 'th'. In some Spanish regions like parts of Andalucia, 's' is pronounced like the standard ...



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