New answers tagged

2

En fait, l’idée d’un vêtement bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. La tournure est correcte, compréhensible et ne choque pas, mais n'est pas complètement idiomatique. Il y a juste une faute d'orthographe : un Londonien (les adjectifs de provenance géographique ne prennent pas de majuscule, mais les noms, si). On peut déplacer ...


-3

En fait, l’idée qu’un vêtement si bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien.


2

I think a direct translation of "There's no such thing" would be "Il n'y a rien de tel", and so you might say, En fait, il n'y a rien de tel dans l'esprit d'un londonien. Or synonyms of tel include pareil and semblable.


4

If the idea (and not just the thing behind the idea) that you’re referring to has been mentioned earlier, you could perhaps further emphasize the “no such idea” notion with "Une telle idée (d’un vêtement bizarre) n'existe même pas." (example of usage from ‘Psychiatrische en Neurologische Bladen, Volume 5’ via ‘Google Books’) To fit “un tel/une telle” ...


0

One possible option is to use the negation point. It basically means not at all. It's hard to find support for this claim on Wordreference, but I have seen this form of empahsis used often, at least in a literary context. L’idée d’un vêtement bizarre n’existe point


-1

I would say something like: Il n'existe pas quelque chose de bizarre comme ... I have never heard about the "l’idée d’un vêtement bizarre n’existe même pas", but it is easy to understand the meaning for French speakers.


4

About n'existe même pas, the expression matches "there is no such thing" (more precisely "doesn't even exist"). I would have preferred this slightly modified sentence: L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. or L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre ne viendrait même pas à l'esprit d'un ...


6

Your sentence is perfectly correct, but you could use the alternative: L'idée même d'un vêtement bizarre n'existe pas dans l'esprit londonien. The difference is mostly stylistic, there is no real difference in meaning. It could be translated word-by-word to "the very idea of strange clothes doesn't exist in the londonian spirit."



Top 50 recent answers are included