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11

If it is pronounced [oi] as I think, you just have to use a dieresis ¨ (tréma in French). It already exists in French, for instance my first name is Lo‌ï‌c, pronounced [loik], as opposed to Lo‌i‌c [lwak].


10

One advice: read introduction books/resources in Spanish and in English. After the introduction phase I don't think it makes much of a difference. (Assuming you are fluent enough in Spanish.) Example: Learning German pronunciation from the point of view of a French speaker is easier when explained from French than from English. But basic German vocabulary ...


4

In French, this pronounciation often goes along with y in written text (I think of “oyez” and “royal”), you can use that if you want to describe it. It's also the pronunciation of -ille in French, which forces the i out of any bigram it could form with the preceding vowel, as in “paille” (and arguably, in “corbeille”). I have the feeling there's something ...


3

It's a lot easier for a native French speaker (who's not very good with languages) to learn Spanish (or Italian): The sound of English is hard on the ear: Natives living in villages near NATO bases after World War II thought that "they spoke like ducks". The discrepancy between written and spoken is absurd: Worcester, Y, ... The habit of inverting ...


3

Common sense would dictate that, Spanish being closer to French, it may be easier to learn the latter from the former; but I do not think this is entirely true – or at least, that it is not always true. My background is that of a native French speaker who is fluent in English but was never able to master Spanish; I have devoted a lot of time to teaching ...


1

La formule « c'était il y a longtemps » est beaucoup utilisée, et elle sonne mieux que « ça a été il y a longtemps », qui n'est pas très belle, et pas correcte. À la place, tu peux dire « ça s'est passé il y a longtemps », ce serait à peu près la même chose. « C'était il y a longtemps » implique qu'on décrit une action qui était en train de se faire, sans ...


1

Lol I'm having the same issue but with the difference that I'm a native Spanish speaker who is perfectly fluent in English. I've been learning for a month now (almost exclusively French/English) and just today I started doing exercises in French/Spanish. I must say, at the very beginning it was quite handy knowing Spanish because of the phrase structure, ...


1

I don't think one should see it as an either/or thing. Rather use your knowledge of both English and Spanish along with the cognitive ability to learn a new language (which you have already demonstrated in fact). Of course your speed will be faster given that you are already aware of things like the subjunctive and latin roots.



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