Hot answers tagged

8

No, "Qui ne l'aurait pas ?" is not appropriate here. As a native French speaker it took me some time to understand that sentence. It is true that in the locution "avoir besoin" uses the verb "avoir", and grammatically I don't think there is a problem with your sentence. But "avoir" is so tightly linked with the word "besoin" that the sentence stops making ...


7

Your sentence is perfectly correct, but you could use the alternative: L'idée même d'un vêtement bizarre n'existe pas dans l'esprit londonien. The difference is mostly stylistic, there is no real difference in meaning. It could be translated word-by-word to "the very idea of strange clothes doesn't exist in the londonian spirit."


7

I would say "Comment a-t-il l'air d'aller ?" or simply "Comment va-t-il ?". "De quoi a-t-il l'air ?" is possible too, but it refers more to the physical appearance.


6

To the extent that “nailed it” can mean “spot-on,” you could use “{être} En plein dans le mille” [here sarcastically] for the doughnut caption (from ‘Reverso’), but negating this for the Londoner example would be awkward, so for that you could consider “{être toujours} à côté de la plaque” (also from ‘Reverso’). "Aussi doués qu'ils puissent être, il y a un ...


6

Si j'ai bien compris le concept, il s'agit simplement d'arroseurs arrosés. L'expression est particulièrement pertinente dans ce contexte puisqu'il s'agit du titre d'un des tous premiers films de l'histoire du cinéma.


5

Drôle can have two meanings depending on the context : the most common one is "amusant, comique", and a less used one is "bizarre, curieux". I would translate drôle in this sentence by "weird" or "strange". This second meaning is often implied by the use of "un drôle de" + noun.To answer your question, not only "drôle de" can be used sarcastically but it is ...


5

Les deux phrases sont justes et compréhensibles. On préférera cependant employer le verbe "se retrouver" (l'équivalent en anglais serait to meet), qui est plus naturel : Retrouvons-nous au café à 3 heures !


4

1 - 2 / "Il en est" is a rather archaic equivalent of "il y en a" : "there is / are". "Tant", in this context, means the same as "autant" : "so many / much". "Tant que" also means"while" but that doesn't work here. Putting that together word by word, this phrase means "if there are so many that the wolf eats". If you take what comes before, the meaning ...


4

"à croire que XXX" means that the guy talking is so suprised that he could have come to believe that XXX. XXX is something that would explain the situation, but which is not likely at all. It is a not serious hypothesis, often a hyperbole or a joke. Here an example: Tu es déjà au bureau alors qu'il n'est même pas 7h, à croire que tu es resté ici toute ...


4

About n'existe même pas, the expression matches "there is no such thing" (more precisely "doesn't even exist"). I would have preferred this slightly modified sentence: L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. or L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre ne viendrait même pas à l'esprit d'un ...


4

If the idea (and not just the thing behind the idea) that you’re referring to has been mentioned earlier, you could perhaps further emphasize the “no such idea” notion with "Une telle idée (d’un vêtement bizarre) n'existe même pas." (example of usage from ‘Psychiatrische en Neurologische Bladen, Volume 5’ via ‘Google Books’) To fit “un tel/une telle” ...


4

You cannot really use the same word to translate "to nail" in both "As good as they may be, there's an aspect Londoners cannot quite nail" and the picture, because they carrying different meaning. In the sentence, it means "to understand something/to get the meaning of something right", and corresponding slang would be "capter" or "piger". Depending on the ...


4

Accroire est ancien, il est tombé en désuétude Accroires, mot récent inconnu de Grammalecte, ne fait pas partie du vocabulaire parlé en France Liste d'exemples québécois d'accroires Familièrement on dit « Tu me racontes des craques » pour « Tu veux me faire accroire que ... »


4

'Il était une fois' is the french equivalent of 'once upon a time'. The il doesn't refer to anything and is used in a general sense, like in 'il pleut' (it's raining). 'Ce n'était que', on the other hand, means "it was only", and the ce refers specifically to that eight day stay, which was only walks, hunting, fishing, etc... So no, they are not ...


3

Ce ne sont pas des synonymes au sens strict, mais des transpositions possibles : Se procurer les outils pour travailler à Trouver des solutions pratiques au problème S'offrir les moyens de réussir


3

De is indeed a preposition here. This usage isn't unique to suivre, but can appear whenever you want to say you did something with your eyes: Je l'ai vu de mes propres yeux (I saw it with my own two eyes) Je l'ai confirmé de mes yeux (I confirmed it with my eyes) Il m'a foudroyé des yeux (He glared at me, lit. He lightninged me with his eyes) ...


3

There are several variants of the song Je cherche après Titine (probably short for a woman called Martine or Christine). The line you quote does not appear in the original lyrics written in 1917 where Titine is definitely a woman. It's this first version of the song, that the American soldiers who had been fighting in France at the end of WW1 brought back ...


3

For the last sentence, "saisir" carry the meaning, without the familiar register: Aussi doués qu'ils soient, il y a un aspect que les londoniens ne saisiront jamais. (As good as they may be, there's an aspect Londoners will never truly succeed to understand/achieve) The expression "avoir tout bon / avoir tout juste" is more familiar and is less linked ...


3

Selon http://www.wordreference.com/fren/à%20croire%20que, ça me paraît signifier: You would think... It's hard to believe... Étant donnés les faits, c'est possible que l'expression démontre l'incrédulité qui s'oppose à la croyance populaire, ou d'une croyance étonnante. Voici des examples: À croire qu'il ne tromperait jamais sa femme, malgré ...


3

"De quoi" is translation of "things" For example: "J'ai de quoi faire" = "I have things to do" You can say "Nous avons prévu ce qui peut vous réchauffer", but meaning is a little different : "We have prepared things that can warm you up" Phonetically, your proposition sounds like "Nous avons prévu ceux qui vous réchauffent" = "We have prepared those that ...


3

The primary meaning of 'pouvoir' is "to have the power to", but it is widely used in many different context (ability, possibility, permission) so that a translation out of context is quite difficult. In your first example, it seems that the ability is stressed, but maybe he was expecting that I would not talk to him anymore because of some very ...


3

I would translate your sentence as Funny notion of friendship you have there! In fact I wonder where you got the translation "drôle de" as meaning "incredible/terrific". "Drôle" means "funny", amusing, and is is quite often used sarcastically, just as in English.


3

Québécois ici. Personellement, n'ai jamais entendu ce mot employé comme nom. Malgré tout, les exemples ne manquent pas rien que sur le site de La Presse. C'est surtout dans les citations ou les commentaires, donc clairement perçu comme un usage oral (remarquez d'ailleurs les guillementsdans certains examples): Les Gabrielle de Laval - et celles de ...


3

I perfectly see why you would ask that! Words like effectivement, certes... are words used to express agreement or objection during a speech (more words like these there : http://www.connectigramme.com/connecteurs.html/concession.htm). They are often used alone. If it is the case, they just express the person's view on what the other person just said, when ...


3

En fait, "instant karma fail" comporte deux parties distinctes : "instant karma" et "fail". "instant karma" -> "instant karmic retribution" -> retour de karma instantané. Le retour de karma est un coup du sort qui punit celui qui a mal agit (ou plus rarement récompense celui qui a bien agit). Le fait qu'il soit instantané lui donne un effet cocasse. Pour ...


3

En français, on peut parler de karma dans les situations qui correspondent à celles des vidéos. C'est le karma! Mais ça reste une expression récente et qui n'est pas comprise par tous, il y a des chances de ne pas être compris si on essaie d'utiliser le mot karma. Mais il existe des expressions idiomatiques pour désigner exactement la même chose : ...


2

Du manger here is a somewhat elevated formulation where they are using the nominalized form of this infinitive (only a few infinitives can be used that way), which means "food". Usually it's used with implications about the pleasures of eating or in the set expression le boire et le manger, i.e. "drinks and food" (perdre le boire et le manger: to be obsessed ...


2

So first of all, you can't really separate the sentence. Here it should be read in French as "On voit ici que de jeunes enfants, surtout de jeunes filles belles, bien faites, et gentilles, font très mal d’écouter toute sorte de gens, et que ce n’est pas chose étrange, s’il en est tant que le loup mange". The last part, the one that you asked about means it's ...


2

It can be both. For example, as a state (or context): Quand il nous a expliqué que ce ne serait pas possible, je pense qu'il avait raison. As an event (or a step in the narration): On lui a dit de vendre la maison. Il a eu raison de ne pas le faire. Depuis les prix des logements ont flambé.


2

En fait, l’idée d’un vêtement bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. La tournure est correcte, compréhensible et ne choque pas, mais n'est pas complètement idiomatique. Il y a juste une faute d'orthographe : un Londonien (les adjectifs de provenance géographique ne prennent pas de majuscule, mais les noms, si). On peut déplacer ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible