New answers tagged

-1

Lately reading this question and its answers, suddenly came to my mind that probably none of them was really an answer to the question! No offense to the authors: I find all answers pertinent. The problem is that they all come from French sources (stated in profile for two authors, the third answer clearly identifyings its French sources). Now accurately ...


3

The PDF article* linked in hunter's comments to the question was right on point. It considers three hypotheses on the origin of French partitives. I will just mention them here so other members can form an idea ahead of reading the article itself. The Deleted Quantifier Hypothesis: According to this, French partitives derive from a form consisting of: ...


2

The text describes the freshwater insect that is called by the author "niveau d'eau douce" and is drawn just below the title. Looking like a hammer shark, its T shape evokes a "niveau". It also has three legs on each side. In this text, the only reference to an inclinometer is the word "niveau". It is used to give a name to the insect because their shapes ...


1

I'd like to mention La Fontaine -- a contemporary of Molière, but read in primary school (so arguably more "foundational"), and (like Shakespeare's in English) many of his phrases have become proverbial.


2

The spelling is very correct, it didn't change since when this famous sentence was coined by Descartes in 1637 (later cogito ergo sum in 1644). The typography matches what was used it that time, only the final s has its current shape while the other ones are using the now obsolete long variant.


7

On désigne parfois en effet la langue française avec la périphrase « la langue de Molière » (18e), mais certains ont parlé de la langue de Voltaire, d'Hugo ; ou de la langue de Tremblay pour le joual québécois par exemple. D'aucuns l'ont dit, au delà de la périphrase, il s'agit d'une question de perspective, d'époque etc., c'est un choix. D'autre part, ce ne ...


2

Comme on l'a dit, Larousse donne adverbe et adj. invariable « O.K. » ou « okay ». Le TLFi donne « O.K. » en majuscule, loc. adv., et mentionne « okay » en référant à Bonheur d'occasion (G. Roy, éd. Pascal, 1945 ; l'éd. de 2009 de Boréal utilise « O.K. » uniquement !) Le LBU14 utilise « O. K. » (aux §§ 190 et 1108). Au DHLF/Rey, on note « O. K. » avec ...


3

This motto would translate to something akin to : May Concorde bring men closer. It loses a bit of meaning in the translation though : in French, Concorde also designates Concordia, the Roman goddess of agreement and peace. To elaborate on your sub-questions : There is no missing clause to indicate it's a command or prayer. The sentence is complete ...


15

We often call the French language "la langue de Molière". Molière was a playwright and actor who lived in the 17th century, and he is well-known for his comedies such as "Tartuffe" or "L'Avare".


3

A sentence starting with "Que" seems to be an equivalent to "May". You can find the same construction in Star Wars : Que la force soit avec toi May the force be with you Here: Que Concorde rapproche les hommes May Concorde allow people to get closer The problem here is to translate "rapprocher"... It litteraly means "make people be ...


2

L'étymologie O.K. (venant de all correct => all correct => OK) semble partagée également là: wikipedia qui cite Alain Rey propose également: En 1840, le terme a été utilisé par des partisans de Martin Van Buren, élu à la présidence des États-Unis en 1837, et surnommé « Old Kinderhook » (« le vieux de Kinderhook ») du nom de son village natal. Un ...


2

L'étymologie réelle de cette expression porte encore confusion à ce que j'ai pu lire en complément des sources que tu cites. Il semble que le dictionnaire français considère l'origine comme étant "oll korrect", en ce cas O.K. serait l'orthographe juste puisque l'on fait un sigle de cette expression (différence sigle/acronyme). Comme W.C. dans le temps. ...


-1

Si on recherche la fréquence des variantes dans Google ngram c'est evident que, malgré les argumentations excellents par rapport à l'Oklahoma et l'étymologie, «OK» est la forme le plus commune. Le 9é dictionnaire de l'Académie française n'a pas les mots «O.K.», «ok», «o.k.», «OK» ni «okay». On peut trouver d' autres locutions pour exprimer les sens ...



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