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The ancient conjugation of the imparfait used "oi" instead of "ai". So, we said, "je mangeois, tu mangeois, il mangeoit...". Moreover, "oi" was not pronouced "[oua]" as it is today, but "[ouè]". It is said that once, Louis XVI's brother, who came back from a long exile in England to replace Napoleon after Waterloo and restore the ancient kingdom under the ...


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The scan you posted seems to be from a later reprint. Here is the same sentence from the 1710 edition of the Mémoires d'Anne d'Autriche : There is an additional archaism compared to your sample, savoir has the older spelling scavoir. However, à peu près is written the usual way. Laffemas avait promis au Ministre qu'il le tourmenterait si bien qu'il ...


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Well here is the Modern French translation of your phrase : Laffemas avait promis au Ministre qu'il le torturerait jusqu'à en tirer à peu près tout ce qu'il en désirait savoir, et qu'il trouverait, à partir des quelques futilités qu'il dirait, les moyens de lui faire son procès... At first I thought tourmenter was meant to say harass -which is the case ...


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Some recent knowledge I happened upon courtesy of @Gilles leads me to guess that tourmenteroit is an archaic conditional conjugation of tourmenter, and thus the opening words mean "Laffernas had promised the Minister that he would torment him if..." As for a-peu-pres, it is almost certainly an old-fashioned way of writing the modern à peu près, meaning ...


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From personal experience of French. [qwerty]. 'Histoire de' is a shortcut relaxed/informal style for the English 'Just to'. Conveys the idea of derision (la route est longue, mangeons des bonbons, histoire de tromper la faim) ; cynism (le directeur m'a renvoyee, histoire de montrer qui est le patron) ; dare (il a achetera le tout dernier modele, histoire de ...


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In addition to "grandir" given by Anne Aunyme, you could use "vieillir" (literally "to age", "to grow old") See this definition (in french), or this one (in english).


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You can use "grandir" (to grow): Les enfants sont toujours impatients de grandir, de pouvoir se coucher tard et conduire une voiture. Of course it is more vague than the English "to grow up", but the precision will have to be given by the context.


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Fine in this case is linked to the quality of the meal you are expecting. You can find epiceries fines or boucherie fine still in some places. There, you'll find high quality or rare products. Faire la fine bouche Means been difficult and needing special treatment and better meals Avoir un palais fin Means having good and precise taste. It's ...


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"Fine bouche" means "thin mouth" (the prononciation is close in french and in english, by the way). It was originally "petite bouche" ("small mouth"). If you're a gourmet, you're more likely to eat your food little by little, not opening your mouth too wide and less likely to swallow big chunk without masticating. Thus the expression. Like Papa Poule said ...


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Fine bouche is literally meaning: Fine mouth or Delicate mouth. It's an expression that relates to the mouth you use to eat and the fact that people have to be delicate in their food choice: you are a picky eater, hence not everything will go through this mouth. You have this the expression like this.


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"Jamais", comme "pas" ,"point" et "rien", désigne étymologiquement un minimum: "jamais" signifie "un seul instant" ou "une seule fois" ou "le plus court instant", "pas" signifie "la plus petite distance", "point" signifie "la plus petite surface" et "rien" signifie "la plus petite chose". Cela étant admis, on comprend alors pourquoi "jamais", "pas", "point" ...


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Very interesting note, it's queer, as you stress it, to juxtapose two imperative forms having opposite meanings (to go is the opposite of to come) and juxtaposing also two differents persons ("tu" and "vous"). In fact, it shows that the expression "Allez!" has shifted its original meaning towards the fact that we use it to take the lead on the person(s) to ...


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Here "allez" is an interjection translating the impatience of the locutor. It comes from the imperative of "aller", of course, but here it is only used for his interjection value. A good example of an interjection in English is "c'mon", as one can say "C'mon, why is this happening to me ?" without anyone wanted to come actually. "viens" is a real imperative ...


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Usually the verb represents a movement, the fact of going somewhere, or about to do something. Here, the verb is used in its imperative form to represent a wish, exhortation, threat or indignation. The following wiki page has more detailed information on it. "À l’impératif, sert également à faire des souhaits, des exhortations ou des menaces et à marquer ...


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Some of these French filler words are very common and sometimes very ugly: In the 80's and the 90's, most people used to say "pis bon ben" between two sentences, an ugly contraction of "puis, bon eh bien". Nowadays, "pis bon ben" has mostly disappeared, but it's been replaced by another ugly terminator: "(...)Mais bon, voilà, quoi".


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The standard and less classy one are "heu" (er), "quoi" (what), "bah/ben/bien" (well). But you can also use some basic one : "En fait", "au fond", (in fact...) "En vérité" (verily...) "Alors" (So, then) "Vous savez/Tu sais" (You know) "Vous voyez/Tu vois" (You see) "Croyez-moi/Crois-moi" (Believe me) "hein" (okay) You can always use swear words as filler ...


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It seems the verb can be used by a child towards her mother. When Jean-Pierre Vial was asked to write a variation on Twinkle Twinkle Little Star he referenced the original name of the tune (as used by Mozart) which is "Ah, vous dirais-je, Maman" and named his variation "Ma Mère, J'Te Kiffe Trop Grave"



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