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1

Besides all the good answers given, let's also mention the fact that Luce comes from Latin lux and as such is linked to light (and day).


3

1/ To grow (croître), it means: how little the length of the day varies. 2/ It's at St Luce's day, from St Luce's day. 3/ Luce or Lucie, is Lucie de Syracuse: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucie_de_Syracuse About the proverb: https://fr.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=%C3%A0_la_Sainte-Luce,_les_jours_croissent_du_saut_d%E2%80%99une_puce ...


1

Reference "À la Sainte Luce" is refering to Lucie de Syracuse who is celebrated the 13 of December. Meaning The general meaning is about the evenings which are becoming longer (but not the whole day). It is explained in french here and I will translate this sentence : En effet, si le soleil se lève de plus en plus tard, il se couche également de ...


1

The best way you could use it as a standalone word would be, J'ai mangé (toute) la tarte et, depuis, j'ai mal au ventre. As said before. The reason is simple: the commas are used to do what we call a "proposition explicative" in french, therefore the sentence could be valid and have the same meaning without it. J'ai mangé (toute) la tarte et j'ai ...


1

I'd be inclined to say depuis lors instead of using it alone; but I might be wrong, or maybe that's old-fashioned or formal. I think that if you did use depuis lors instead of just depuis alone, then you wouldn't need the (stop) in the first quote of Random's answer. J'ai mangé la tarte (optional stop), et depuis (stop), j'ai mal au ventre. J'ai ...


12

A famous example of that "depuis" standing truly alone: Bien avant Arminius nous en avions pris l'habitude et, depuis, nous l'avons conservée. [ M. le général C. de Gaulle, Disc. et messages, 11 novembre 1942 ] Note the position of the commas; I would therefore use: J'ai mangé (toute) la tarte et, depuis, j'ai mal au ventre. The comma ...


6

Here, having a comma implies a stop in pronunciation : J'ai mangé la tarte (optional stop), et depuis (stop), j'ai mal au ventre. It implicitly says : J'ai mangé la tarte. Et depuis [que j'ai mangé la tarte], j'ai mal au ventre. I believe the stop is made to understand that we omit a part of the sentence. With the full stop after the first part ...


8

Oui, les deux traductions sont valides. "Depuis" n'est pas toujours utilisé en début de phrase. Par exemple: "J'étudie le français depuis 1983" (I study french since 1983)



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