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0

Les deux formes sont équivalentes. Il n'y en a pas une de vraiment plus utilisée que l'autre. La forme avec la relative que ... est un peu plus lourde (mais plus facile à construire car générique), elle ne profite pas de la forme allégée avec l'infinitif: Les verbes d'affirmation, de sensation peuvent en général utilise cette tournure avec un infinitif, ...


2

Ils disent l'avoir connue. and Ils disent qu'ils l'ont connue. mean exactly the same thing, but the first sentence is less frequent in spoken French. A similar construction (verbe + infinitif) can be found in: Il prétend être notre ami. (Il prétend qu'il est notre ami) J'aimerais avoir à nouveau vingt ans. (J'aimerais que j'aie à nouveau ...


0

For me, those two versions are exactly the same, put apart the wording of the second one is rather cumbersome... So you can use : dire + avoir/être + participe passé + complément (COD, CC de lieux, de temps,...) dire + pronom + avoir/être + participe passé (if the complement has already be defined in the sentence) dire + QUE + avoir/être CONJUGUÉS + ...


0

Both forms are correct and equivalent. A verb directly following another verb is generally (always?) at the infinitive (first case.) The verb located in a proposition subordonnée is conjugated (second case.)


2

Your Question 1: The correct meaning is given in your second proposition: "It seemed to me then that I recognized the sentiment that I read on all the faces. The "il" of "il m'a semblé..." is exactly your "B" guess: it's a placeholder meaning precisely "it seemed to me". So, after "il me semble" you may either place a proposition that must begin with "que" ...


1

I would have translated it with something like that: I had the impression that I could distinguish the feeling that was visible on all the faces.


1

Your guess B is right, "il" is unpersonnal, you may rephrase it : J'ai l'impression d'avoir reconnu le sentiment [...] J'ai eu l'impression de reconnaître le sentiment [...] I don't feel the complexity of the sentence. the "m'" makes it clear the subject is "I", and "Il me semble" is a very common way to express a doubt, so you recognize it and you ...


4

You were close, the proper way would be: Être aimé, c'est être connu.


1

As other posters have mentioned, there are many different uses of "de" in French. To address your question specifically: "de" is used in an impersonal form : Il est facile de + infinitif Il est facile de se perdre = It's easy to get lost. Il est facile de comprendre l'anglais = It's easy to understand English. There is also "à": "à" is ...


9

By the way, your sentence: Il n'est pas difficile de comprendre pourquoi le samedi est ma journée favorite. is translated this way in English: It's not hard to understand why Saturday is my favourite day. In this case, removing de would be exactly the same mistake as removing to in the English version: It's not hard understand why Saturday is ...


1

"de" followed by an infinitive usually just means "to + verb". Of course, "de" has other purposes (e.g. property "le chat de ma tante"), but they're usually not followed by an infinitive.


10

The word "de" in French is used for many different things that have nothing in common most of the time -- you should not try to look for a common sense between these usages. In particular it "de" can be used to introduce a description. Here your problem seems to be the difference between these two sentences for example: Il est bon d'être chez soi. (It ...



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