New answers tagged

3

TL;DR : when applied to a noun, the positive form expresses a need while the negative form indicates the absence of need. When applied to a verb, the positive indicates an obligation while the negative expresses an interdiction. Make sure the negation is applied to falloir and not to another part of the sentence. You're right, in this particular case "pas" ...


1

Depending on the context and the expression, il faut has several translations : one need, one must, one should, it is required, it is suitable, it takes, ... In all of your examples, falloir might be translated by "require": Il ne faut pas y aller. → It is not required/allowed to go there. Il ne faut pas longtemps pour y aller. → It doesn't ...


4

In this context, que means the same thing as ne que. French speakers often omit the word ne in negative sentences; this does not change the meaning. Here is some general information about this phenomenon: Omission of ne in the negative This can be called incorrect, but it's very common in the spoken language (Christensen 39, Lehti & Laippala "Results")...


2

La phrase est incorrecte. On doit dire: J'ai l'impression de n'avoir survécu que pour devenir vieux et décrépi. On peut dire aussi: J'ai l'impression d'avoir survécu uniquement pour devenir vieux et décrépi.


1

Vous ne pouvez pas mettre un équipement. would be correct if you added some precision after it (especially an indication of a place). For example: Vous ne pouvez pas mettre un équipement à cet endroit / ici. I can't find a sentence where we would use this one (which doesn't sound natural for me): Vous ne pouvez pas mettre des équipements ...


3

Historically, in Old French, ne conveyed the negation, with the n- prefix that conveys negation in many Indo-European languages. The second negative particle was an adverb that clarified what was negated: “ne … jamais” = “not … ever” (i.e. “never”), “ne … aucun” = “not … one [of a set]” (i.e. “none”), etc. Over time, it became the norm in French to ...


1

"de" est utilisé ici pour désigner quelque chose de qualitatif. C'est pour cela que l'on utilise pas "des" ou "un(e)" après "pas" ou "ne...pas" qui sont des articles définis, en général. Vos deux phrases Je ne mange pas de pommes Je ne peux pas manger de pommes sont donc correctes, mais ne signifient pas la même chose. La première Je ne mange ...


3

Often, indefinite articles (un/une/des) change to « de » when negated, even if it's plural. J'ai vu un chien chez toi / Je n'ai pas vu de chien chez toi Tu veux une pastèque fraîche ? / Tu ne veux pas de pastèque fraîche ? Il a des vacances chaque mois / Il n'a pas de vacances chaque mois


0

Partial negation: Tous ne sont pas de vils flagorneurs. Ils ne sont pas tous des vils flagorneurs. Complete negation: Aucun n'est un vil flagorneur. I think you cannot make a complete negation with 'tous'. You must use 'Aucun' (= 'None (of them)').


3

Are you certain "all of them are not" is a 'complete' negation? Anyway, I would say that a complete negation in french would be "None of them is", translated exactly into "Aucun n'est [un vil flagorneur]" (note the use of singular, like in english).



Top 50 recent answers are included