New answers tagged

1

Question avec forme positive => oui ou non Manges-tu des pommes ? => oui (j'en mange) / non (je n'en mange pas) Question avec forme négative => non ou si Ne prends-tu pas des gants ? Tu ne prends pas des gants ? => non (je ne prends pas de gantss ) ou si ( je prends des gants)


4

L'agrément s'exprime normalement avec un « non » qui reprend la négation de l'assertion. — Ce n'est pas une question déjà posée. — Non, c'en est une nouvelle. Oui est peu idiomatique ici mais néanmoins équivalent à non. — Oui, c'en est une nouvelle. Référence: TLFi, « oui » Oui, adv. ... III. − [En concurrence avec non; marque ...


2

There's a handy word si just for this. It means yes to a negative question. So, behold: Are you coming? Yes, I am. (Oui.) Are you not coming? Yes, I am! (Si!) Are you coming? No, I'm not. (Non.) Are you not coming? No, I'm not. (Non.) So if asked Tu viens pas ?, and you are coming, you can say Si, je viens!


2

native French speaker here. I can understand why you're confused: when I learned English, I was surprised at how clear the distinctions were... and still they were hard for me to remember. "Il ne faut pas partir" means that you MUST NOT leave, as in you have to stay where you are, by default. In specific contexts, it could mean that you DON'T HAVE TO leave, ...


-1

You're both wrong and right actually, the first two exemples are less restrictive, it's more like "we shouldn't leave" The second two exemple are more restrictives and like "we can't leave" But there isn't "nécessairement" in both exemples so you shouldn't translate it in your sentence, it's more in the meaning that "necesserary" is present than in the ...


8

“Qu'as fait tu ?” is not correct. According to francaisfacile.com (emphasis mine), in questions: On conjugue un verbe impérativement en plaçant le pronom sujet a) après le verbe aux temps simples et b) après l'auxiliaire aux temps composés. So the correct phrasing is Qu'as-tu fait ? And the negation: Que n'as-tu pas fait ?


6

Qu'as-tu fait ? Que n'as-tu pas fait ? Que n'as-tu pas fait ? est une formule soutenue, L'usage habituel (et correct) : Qu'est-ce que tu n'as pas fait ?


6

Your understanding is correct, and Nico Mezeret's rule of thumb is actually the correct answer. Litterary form This is the dated/litterary form of "ne" (actually "ne … pas" with "pas" being omitted), followed by a "que". Thus, the (simplified) sentence On ne saurait en conclure que l'alchimie est une religion. could be written On ne ...


4

I'm not sure if this is a proper rule, but I suppose a way to distinguish between the two is by looking at what follows the 'que'. If the que is there to introduce a subordinate clause, like in your example, then it is the ne littéraire. If the que introduces a verb, a noun, an action etc (ie je ne mange que de la viande, je n'aime que dormir sur le dos), ...


1

In English to my ear these three sentences have slightly different connotations: "Is Charles here?" - simple question of fact "Isn't Charles here?" - surprise "Is Charles not here?" - puzzlement or even suspicion, asking for verification that he really isn't here. I would therefore translate them as follows: "Is Charles here?" - Charles est-il ici? ...


1

Charles n'est pas ici? This is correct, but we would say "là" instead of "ici", which is smoother. Note there is a "liaison" on the "s" of "pas" before "ici". N'est pas elle là Indeed, this is not correct, you should say: N'est-elle pas là ? Note there is a "liaison" on the "t" of "est".



Top 50 recent answers are included