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In French there is no notion as strong as the English uncountable nature of certain things. In you can think about a way to count something, you can speak about it as a countable. For example, you can separate information in pieces of information, and it makes it countable: in French you say "une information" for "a piece of information". Same goes for ...


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For example, can a present infinitive serve as subject of a sentence? ("To be or not to be, that is the question.") . How is (a) or (b) again different from de + infinitive as found, for example, in this sentence from Camus's The Stranger "To be or not to be" is a clause in the infinitive, not a noun. Any infinitive clause can indeed ...


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Your question calls for a distinction between the verb in the infinitive that remains a verb when used in the grammatical place of a noun and the "infinitif substantivé". The infinitive that is a full verb (what Grevisse calls infinitif pur). It is fully perceived as a verb, it cannot be preceded by a determiner or a preposition. It can hold: The place ...


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1) No. A noun would take an article, and usually a plural form. Un être, des êtres for a being, beings, from the verb to be. Try that with to rain, to think, or simply the vast majority of the verbs, and it doesn't work. A verb becoming a noun (substantivé) is nothing more than a specific and rare etymological occurrence. They have different meanings and ...


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Il s'agit d'un adjectif substantivé, qui n'a pas de genre et nombre a priori. On peut donc employer au choix, hors d'autres contraintes, un allié, une alliée, des alliés. Dans le cas cité, il est obligatoire de l'accorder avec le sujet, puisqu'il le précise: L'information est alliée avec toi => Elle est ton alliée stratégique. Elle est ton amie. ...


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Pour aider, on peut dire : Faites de l'information une alliée stratégique. Ici il est clair que "alliée" est un nom commun, et donc s'accorde. On a donc de même : Faites de l'information votre alliée stratégique. Edit: Comme guillaume le fait remarqué, « Allié(e) » est un nom à double genre, ce qui n'est pas le cas de tous les noms communs: on ...



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