New answers tagged

2

To ask about something that is a general proposition: holidays (or day, exam, etc.) in French is: vouloir savoir + comment + se passer [quelque chose]. This is not demander quelque chose or poser une question. For events or things like exams or holidays: Je voulais te demander comment se sont passées tes vacances. Je voulais te demander comment s'est ...


1

ask somebody (a question) about something = demander à quelqu'un quelque chose poser à quelqu'un une question sur quelque chose


7

Poser une question : Je demande à Jean s'il peut me prêter son livre Se renseigner : Je lui demande comment il a passé ses vacances Demander un objet, un service : Je lui demande de me prêter son livre Demander quelque chose à quelqu'un sur un tiers (ou sur ce qu'il peut me faire connaître) : Je lui demande des renseignements sur la situation ...


3

That's the very same rule you already mentioned about permettre de. Here the expression is avoir un risque de, i.e. risquer de.


2

Il y a une question à moi That could be heard from a native french speaker. But is not grammatically correct. Its meaning depends on the context : Il y a une question pour moi You have got the good meaning for that, no need to explain further. Il y a une question de moi Means this is a question i submit Il y a une question à : This ...


0

Bonjour, Oui tu peux remplacer 'Paris' par 'y' mais dans ce cas tu dois changer atteindre par autre chose. Je ne sais pas vraiment quelle est la règle derrière cela mais tu devra dire : Je veux y aller dans quelques heures.


5

Dans la grande majorité des dialectes, "y" ne peut avoir comme antécédent que des groupes ou des propositions introduites par les prépositions "à", "en", et quelques autres prépositions à sens locatif (chez, dans, etc.). Ce n'est pas le cas ici, puisqu'"atteindre" demande un complément d’objet direct, le pronom attendu étant donc: Je veux l'atteindre ...


1

On dirait plutôt "je veux l'atteindre dans quelques heures".


2

In this case de is a preposition used to complement the noun prix. It is not partitive article used to indicate a certain amount. In your terms indeed it is simply “de” (which translates to of) followed by “la salade de tomates”. What happens in the question you linked is quite different because the complement does not come right next to the noun but is ...


0

"On y trouve de tout" Is a common oral use in France. To understand de like the de following an indirect transitive verb is a mistake. Let me give you some examples : Au supermarché, on trouve : des fruits, des yaourts, du lait, de la viande et enfin, des caissières souriantes de is not related to the verb trouver construction, but to the ...


1

You might also say: "On peut y trouver de tout" ("de tout" means "all sorts of things" meanwhile "tout" means "everything".


4

Trouver is transitive with a direct object. « Trouver de » is not a construction in itself, however de is commonly used as a partitive article after some verbs. In “trouver de l'argent”, de l'argent (some money) is a direct complement built with the partitive article. Tout is a pronoun which like a few other pronouns (ce, ceci, cela, ça, quelque chose, ...


1

Your sentence is wrong. You need to conjugate the verb: On trouve tout When talking about a place (like Reims), it is referenced by the "y": On y trouve tout "De tout" is used to say that you find "of everything" or "of all", not "everything" per se. So we add the "de". Otherwise, it would imply that you can literally find everything there. Other ...


1

As other posters have mentioned, there are many different uses of "de" in French. To address your question specifically: "de" is used in an impersonal form : Il est facile de + infinitif Il est facile de se perdre = It's easy to get lost. Il est facile de comprendre l'anglais = It's easy to understand English. There is also "à": "à" is ...


9

By the way, your sentence: Il n'est pas difficile de comprendre pourquoi le samedi est ma journée favorite. is translated this way in English: It's not hard to understand why Saturday is my favourite day. In this case, removing de would be exactly the same mistake as removing to in the English version: It's not hard understand why Saturday is ...


1

"de" followed by an infinitive usually just means "to + verb". Of course, "de" has other purposes (e.g. property "le chat de ma tante"), but they're usually not followed by an infinitive.


10

The word "de" in French is used for many different things that have nothing in common most of the time -- you should not try to look for a common sense between these usages. In particular it "de" can be used to introduce a description. Here your problem seems to be the difference between these two sentences for example: Il est bon d'être chez soi. (It ...


0

Along with Von Kar said, it all depends on the language level you want to use. As far as I'm concerned, your sentence is well formed and suits an oral discussion. However the accumulation of 'pour' is obviously unsuited to written expression, where you'd expect a higher sentence grammatical and syntaxic complexity.


2

You don't have to repeat the word "pour" in the second sentence. The word "aussi" is correctly placed. There are a number of ways you can improve the overall sentence however, avoiding repeating twice the word "pour". Also, instead of using the word "aussi", you could consider using the word "également". One way to go would be, for example: ...


4

in the first sentence, you must consider "préposition à" like a noun. Personnally I would write "à" in italic in this case to show that it is not used as a preposition. Indeed, not all preposition indicate a movement: this is a specificity of "à". Parce que la préposition "à" indique un mouvement. Parce que le "à" indique un mouvement. Because ...


2

The "à" is definitely necessary in the sentence because it is the whole point of it. Read it like: Parce que la préposition « à » indique un mouvement In the second sentence, faire à is indeed to be done: Les devoirs sont à faire à la maison : Assignments are to be done at home (i.e. they are homework). De is required in the third sentence as it ...


3

Most of the time you can use the form: sujet - verbe conjugué - COD - préposition - pronom relatif - verbe infinitif For example: I have nobody to talk with. -> Je n'ai personne avec qui parler. "Je" (I) is the subject "ai" (have) is the verb "personne" (nobody) is the COD "avec" (with) is the préposition "qui" is a relatif pronoun. It refers ...


0

Your keyword in this case is "lequel" and "qui". "I have things to work with" translates to "J'ai quelque chose avec lequel travailler" or "j'ai quelque chose pour travailler" ("I have something with which to work") "They have no people to talk to" translates to "Ils n'ont personne avec qui parler". (also means "They have none with whom to talk". "She has ...


0

Indirect object complement goes first in this case (de quel, duquel, auquel and such) De quel instrument jouez-vous/joues-tu ?


6

The grammatically correct sentence would be: De quel instrument jouez-vous ? In non formal, real life, you'll more often hear the casual : Vous jouez de quel instrument ? or even: Tu joues de quoi comme instrument ?


0

"De" goes at begining. De quel instrument jouez-vous ? Je joue de la flûte. EDIT : You can use the verb "pratiquer" without "de" Quel instrument pratiquez-vous ? Je pratique l'accordéon.


-1

You can say "De quel instrument jouez vous ?" or "Quel instrument jouez vous ?" in a more familiar way.


1

There are several ways to translate that, but usually in French the "at -ing" form will be translated by a preposition and a noun. "good" will be translated by "bon" or synonyms like "doué", "fort"... He is good at playing the piano. -> Il est doué au piano. If you want to use a verb you can use the following form, with the adverb "bien": Il joue ...


1

This is a kind of sentence which is hard to translate easily from english. For instance, your examples would become: Il est doué au piano Il est doué pour jouer du piano Ils sont bons en cuisine Elle est mauvaise à la guitare On n'est pas doué pour étudier Here, you may use « doué » and « bon », but on an oral conversion, you will often hear « ...


1

Using “with” or “without” in this fashion in English is just a way to bypass a conditional. The most likely way this would be expressed in French is by using explicit conditionals. Je ne peux pas faire ça si tu meurs. [I can't do it with you(r) dying.] Je ne peux pas faire ça si tu ne m'aides pas. [I can't do it without you(r) helping.]


0

Concerning "beaucoup": In French, "beaucoup" is an adverb, not a noun, so you can't say "un beaucoup". You can say for example: J'aime beaucoup le chocolat. -> I like chocolate very much. J'ai beaucoup dormi. -> I have slept a lot. For your example I suggest you use "grandement": Cela peut grandement améliorer ta mémoire -> This can improve ...


1

"alors que" can do it too: Je ne peux pas faire ça alors que tu es en train de mourir. which means you can't do it because the guy you are talking to is dying. The negative form: Je ne peux pas faire ça alors que tu n'es pas en train de mourir. means that you need the guy you are talking to to be dying so you can do your stuff. If you use ...


0

with you dying. => tandis / pendant que tu meurs. Plus mot à mot : avec toi mourant, avec toi en train de mourir. avec une négation (without), on emploie souvent le subjonctif (hypothétique): without them freaking out. => sans qu'ils deviennent dingues. => sans les rendre dingues.


0

Dans tous les cas, by that peut se traduire simplement en par là, dans des expressions qui expriment une opinion, une affirmation, une pensée: Que voulez-vous dire par là ? Que voulez-vous affirmer par là ? Que voulez-vous exprimer par là ? Qu'entendez-vous par là ? A quoi pensez-vous par là ?


1

That can be either: Qu'est-ce que tu veux dire par là ? or Qu'est ce que tu veux dire avec ça ? Beaucoup isn't used with an article. Il peut améliorer un beaucoup de ton mémoire has multiple issues, I would say: Ça peut beaucoup améliorer ta mémoire.


3

When used as a comparative of bon, better translates to meilleur. There are several way to translate "at". Il est meilleur que moi en musique classique. Il est meilleur que moi comme (or en tant qu') interprète de musique classique. Il est meilleur que moi au piano. Il joue la musique classique mieux que moi. (comparative of bien)



Top 50 recent answers are included