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13

You can't use every verb in its so-called “pronominal” form, but as you have probably observed given your examples, a large majority of verbs potentially can. Now, which can be used where stems to some extent from the range of possible interpretations of a pronominal verb. Let's remind ourselves of the potential possibilities across the language as a whole: ...


10

Si on n'utilise pas de pronom, cette phrase peut aussi être écrite : Les reines ont succédé aux reines. On s’aperçoit que le rôle du pronom réfléchi est celui d'un objet indirect (COI) dans cette phrase. Il apparait aussi que le véritable auxiliaire est avoir, et qu'il ne peut y avoir d'accord puisqu'il n'y a pas d’objet direct. Dans une phrase qui ...


5

Generally, if you want to say “I will do something at/to/on me=myself”, you can use “se faire quelque chose”, as in the examples you give (“I wash myself”, “I told myself”, etc.) Hence, yes, “je m'aime” is “I love¹ myself”. Now, an important part of the usage of “se” is pronominal verbs, seemingly called “reflexive” in English. There's much to say on the ...


5

You need to look at the meanings of the verbs. Elles se maquillent : reflexive because we assume each girl is making herself up. Elles se parlent : reciprocal because we assume there are two or more of them and they're talking to each other/one another. Obviously context is important, but to change from reciprocal to reflexive (or vice versa) we'd usually ...


4

S' is the contracted form of se, which is a reflexive pronoun. French uses reflexive pronouns with a fair number of verbs, more often than in English, where "verb oneself" is pretty rare. For example, French sometimes uses reflexive verbs to render explicit what is implied in English. This can be illustrated with the phrase "I'm going to wash", meaning that ...


3

Se is a pronoun. It is used as direct and indirect object designating the same person or thing as the subject in verbs at the third person. To designate something else, use le, la, les, the speaker use me, nous and the person(s) to whom one speaks, use te, vous. Then there is the class of pronominal verbs for which the use of a reflexive pronoun (se at the ...


3

“S'excuser” is a pronominal verb. “Excuser” means “to excuse”, but is most often used as “s'excuser”, meaning “to apologize”. You can see this question for more on pronominal verbs.


3

Cela peut vouloir dire les deux (aussi bien qu'ils ne s'aiment pas eux-mêmes ou qu'ils ne s'aiment pas les uns les autres). Le contexte est important. Cependant, sans contexte, "les politiciens ne s'aiment pas" implique plus "les uns les autres" que "ne s'aiment pas eux-mêmes".


1

Les politiciens ne s'aiment pas entre eux. Les politiciens ne s'aiment pas l'un l'autre. Pour un sens réciproque. Les politiciens ne s'aiment pas eux-mêmes. Pour un sens réflexif, mais cette formulation garde une ambiguïté entre un sens collectif (le groupe des politiciens n'aime pas le groupe des politiciens) et un sens individuel (chaque ...


1

The Wiktionnary has interesting insights on that matter. My previous answer was wrong, fooled by the feminine, and a better one will come later.



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