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7

The sentence is "passer à côté de [quelque chose]", which, in English, is "to pass by [something]". It means, in this context, "to miss out on something". It is an integral part of the expression; in your translation you translated that part by "close by" which is not correct, it goes with "miss out on". The "[quelque chose]" is, here, the relative pronoun ...


3

The use of dont is not correct here. Dont is the genitive case of the subordinate conjunction. With the correct case, your sentence becomes : Une pensée pour ceux que je n’ai que très rarement pris l’occasion de remercier This sentence is correct, but might be a bit disturbing to hear (because of the que redundancy). If you want something more ...


2

Une pensée pour ceux que j'ai très rarement pris l’occasion de remercier Is enough. "Dont" is used only if "ceux" is not who is "remercié", for example in: Une pensée pour ceux dont j'ai très rarement pris l'occasion de remercier la contribution à ce projet. As here you thanks their contribution and not the people. Note by the way that I removed ...


1

La plus correcte : C'est après la gloire qu'il court. En supprimant le qu' C'est la gloire après laquelle il court. La dernière est totalement incorrecte, elle pourrait être entendue dans la bouche d'un très jeune enfant qui commence à assembler ses phrases.


0

"C'est de moi dont il s'agit" should not be used. It's a common mistake, as many people get mixed up between the two correct sentences "c'est moi dont" and "c'est de moi que".


0

Since I can't comment on the Tyg13 I would like to make an addition to the answer : "où" has never, and will never refer to a specific time. "où" is refering to a place, and in most cases it is not good practice to use it when the subject is not strictly a matter of location. "Où es-tu ?" "Où ce trouve la bibliothèque ?", theses questions ask for a place, ...


3

One of the difficulties arises due to the fact that in this case French requires specificity where English uses the unspecific "that". In French, you can't simply say "The year that I arrived" instead, you must say "The year when I arrived". Since you seem a bit confused as to the roles of "où", "que" and qui, allow me to offer a bit more information to help ...


1

"L'année où tu es né" is the correct way. To avoid confusion, you can say "L'année de ta naissance" instead.


5

(a) and (c) are very broken and incorrect French. "The reason why..." doesn't translate to La raison pourquoi... but La raison pour laquelle... La raison pour laquelle il n'est pas venu à la fête est qu'il a plu. To stay closer to "The reason that...", you might have said the ponderous: La raison qui l'a conduit à ne pas venir à la fête est qu'il ...


2

"Ce qui" and "ce que" are relative pronouns like "qui" and "que"; they introduce a subordinate clause. The choice between the two depends on the grammatical role, subject or direct object, that the relative pronoun has in the subordinate clause. Mais je n’avais qu’à l’étouffer en imaginant ce que seraient mes pensées dans vingt ans quand il me faudrait ...



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