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-1

What is wrong with: Paw-Paw is a veteran, which Tex is very proud of.


3

You can use both, as both are correct. Tex can be proud of Paw-Paw or of the fact that Paw-Paw is a veteran in french as well as in english. Now, the comma make me think the probability of the second choice is more likely because it separate "The fact that Paw-Paw is a veteran" from the second part of the sentence. But then one could ask : Why is Tex proud ...


1

Well you are right everywhere, nothing wrong ! Except that the meaning of the sentence is supposed to be Paw-Paw is a veteran, of what Tex is very proud "dont" actually refers to the fact that Paw-Paw is a veteran; but I agree there is an ambiguity.


1

Or… Voudriez-vous essayer l’une de ces/mes idées.


-1

I would say Avez-vous une idée de ce que vous voulez que nous essayions. But in an other way, I would prefer say: Pouvez-vous m'indiquer ce que vous souhaiteriez que nous essayions? Pouvez-vous m'indiquer ce que vous attendez de notre part? Regards,


2

Both phrases are not correct. If you want to keep this grammatical structure, you should say: Avez-vous une idée que vous voulez que nous essayions? but it sounds strange to my ears. A more natural way would be: Y a-t-il une idée que vous voulez que nous essayions ? (the interrogative form of il y a une idée...)


2

The translation I'm thinking of is : Avez-vous une idée que vous voulez que nous essayions ? Auriez-vous une idée que vous voudriez que nous essayions ? Anyway, your second sentence is incorrect. You can not use vous voulez dont, the correct form would be dont vous voulez that you used in your first sentence. You could indeed say : Avez-...


3

Que refers to the kingdom of Danafal. He comes from the no longer existing kingdom of Danafal, former neighbor of Liones kigdom, that he allegedly destroyed in a fit of anger, which would be his sin.



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