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Yes, phones numbers are usually read this way. Note that in France, as French numbers have a fixed length, most ambiguities are not possible, except perhaps for numbers like +33 (0)1 73 50 60 15 that could also be +33 (0)1 60 13 50 75. In those cases, and in the context of variable length phone numbers, the intonation, or small pauses between numerals ...


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Pour information Pour la prononciation en français il y a, à ma connaissance, trois styles selon le pays. En effet, on distingue le français en France, en Belgique et la Suisse. En France on prononce 70 par soixante-dix et 90 par quatre-vingt-dix. En Belgique on prononce 70 par septante et 90 par nonante. En Suisse, et c'est selon moi le plus logique, on ...


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Essentially, by inflection and marking pauses. For “80, 16”, one would say: Quatre-vingt. [beat] Seize. with the pitch going slightly upward at the end of “80”, while for “96”, one would use: Quatre-vingt-seize. in one go, with pitch going upward at the end of “96” (or downward if at the end of a list or sentence).


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I think @Evpok is right in that you must differentiate between "spanish" R's rolled with the tip of the tongue and ones where the rolling happens at the back of the tongue. As far as I can tell, Piaf used the latter to put emphasis and solemnty to her words (as in "je ne rrregrette rrrien"), but rarely the former. "Back of tongue" rolled R's sound mostly ...


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I can confirm people in western Canada say "pu-teen" and have no idea what you are talking about when you say "pu-tin".



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