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1

The 'g' is soft: softer than 'jam', more like the second 's' in persuasion. The first vowel is not a flat a. Because it's followed by an "n" it's pronunciation is somewhere in between the English "munge", "horn", "harm". In French the vowels change their pronunciation when followed by 'n': so "an" and "en", "in", "on", and "un" have a specific ...


1

The conjunction et [e] is definitely an [e], you're correct. Words in the “[ə] open vs. closed” section seem quite correct except “apparte•ment” that belongs in a category of its own, category which includes mostly adverbs like “justement”, for instance. It's the @ SAMPA symbol, and frankly you could merge them into the mute section. Also : [e] end of ...


0

According to this Histoire the spelling followed the pronunciation until about the XIII century. So (I don't but) do you know how "faire" was spelled in the X through XII centuries? That might give a clue about pronunciation. In Québécois (which is pronounced like Kay-Bek-Way or Kay-Bay-Kway, and whose pronunciation I assume is closer to an older French ...


2

Both are correct on the particular point you refer to. The explanation is different because targeted at different types of learners. The video is meant for learners whose mother tongue is English and points at the differences between the pronunciation of the English letter L in which the tongue touches the alveolar ridge and the upper teeth1 and the ...


1

I think both are correct. The first seems to describe using quite technical jargon, the second is using plain language and is simplifying the description of where your tongue should be. When I pronounce "aller", my tongue touches my alveolar ridge, but sometimes it catches my teeth a little too. The difference in sound is barely distinguishable.


0

The former is the common way or pronouncing that sound although slightly touching the upper teeth shouldn't make that much of a difference.



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