Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I like Reverso, since I often have to work in several languages and it makes it easy to cross-reference. Unfortunately it does not give pronunciation. Anyway, the web address is: http://dictionary.reverso.net


-3

Because it's French, not English, and that's the way the French spell it. The sound of "ais" is the sound of a long "a".


4

It seems the origin of "Calais" is not very clear (source): Selon les époques, la commune a porté différents noms. Le plan ci-dessus, représentant une partie de la Gaule belge en 1616, désigne Calais par Caletum. Ce nom aurait lui-même pour origine Calesium et Calitius, «Ca(l)» désignant le quai, lieu ou port (saxon), et «itius» le nom même du port. On ...


1

Phonetically, this is simply because the sequence of [ʒ]+[s] is almost guaranteed to result in assimilation. This section of the article in particular outlines the hierarchy up which sounds tend to move. Ultimately, it comes down to the fact that those two fricatives are pronounced at very close points of articulation within the mouth and the natural ...


-1

I like this website http://la-conjugaison.nouvelobs.com/du/verbe/finir.php . You can look for any verb you want. To check the pronounciation I use Siri on iPhone. If Siri understands so does anyone.


1

"Je ne sais" is often pronounced in french as "Chais". Many french people will say "Chais pas" instead of "Je ne sais pas" when answering quiclky, it's very common. As a French person, it seems so natual that I've never really thought about it before. I mean, "Chais" doesn't mean anything alone but it's very common when you talk.


8

He is singing ché pas. The phrase je ne sais pas is often pronounced ché pas in colloquial speech because it is easier and faster to say. You could compare this to gotta vs have got to and gonna vs going to in English. In spoken language, words or phrases are often cut short to facilitate speaking. Have a look at this answer for two more examples.


4

I am hearing "ché pas si je t'aime," which might be what you are hearing and describing. "Ché pas" is described as a "Déformation de 'je ne sais pas' " at the cited Wiktionary link.


0

Maybe i'm crazy but i can hear him say the s. He says it quick but you can hear it.


-1

You could also check this website to see if it is useful for you or not: Le Figaro


2

Lexique.org has the resource you're looking for. The transcription keys used are given here. There is also flexique, a newer more supervised version that separates verbs from the other categories.


-1

I found a website where you can listen to them. There's only the most popular verbs. You can choose the verb tense. Here.



Top 50 recent answers are included