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20

Quelques dictionnaires explicatifs (donnant le sens des mots en français), c'est toujours bien de vérifier le sens des mots donnés par les dictionnaires bilingues. http://atilf.atilf.fr/ le Trésor de la Langue Française informatisé (malheureusement les liens vers l'intérieur du site sont temporaires) http://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/ (une série de ...


16

For understanding I suggest (besides the obvious time spent listening) to listen specifically to children's audio books and to "bad" movies. The reason is that in these settings there are over-emphasized phrases that are "over-pronounced" and this is one of the ways to actually get your auditory brain to decide what kind of new sounds are important before ...


15

This may sound obvious, but avoid translated movies/series — pick ones which are natively in French. There aren't so many French series, though. A list of French television series is maintained on Wikipedia. I'd probably recommend starting with animated series. Being targeted at children, the language may be easier. The "Once upon a time..." (Il était une ...


14

Not exactly a series per se, but I found "Qui veut gagner des millions?" to be very interesting to watch to improve my own French. The questions (and answers) are comparable to the English version, with say 50% being cultural (which I mostly hadn't a clue on, but learned a lot from) and 50% being general knowledge (which I knew or could guess at in English), ...


13

French pronunciation is more regular than English, even if the rules are complicated and do have exceptions. So natives and learners need pronunciation information less often than they do with English. Nonetheless most dictionaries do include phonetic transcriptions, so I'm a little puzzled why you feel a lack of those. (What doesn't exist for French is a ...


12

I don't know of any resource as complete as the Oxford 3000, but lists of words sorted by frequency have been compiled by lexicologists, such as: one published on Éduscol (direct PDF link), created by Étienne Brunet, has the most used 1500 words. It is commonly used by elementary or middle school teachers. Wiktionary has another one, with 1750 words all ...


10

http://www.memrise.com/ has a French flashcard system for English speakers. I haven't tried the French version, but I find the Mandarin version very good, so I expect the same for French.


9

I already tried Rosetta Stone, for a short time (so my review could be not exactly the best), also a lot of methods for learning languages. And I get very impressed when I see people talking about it. Here are my thoughts about Rosetta Stone software: The learning system is repetitive. (this is the principle of it, but it didn't work for me) Images and ...


9

I have been teaching myself French for a couple of years now, so I can give some advice from experience. I started with fundamentals: noun genders + le, la, les, un, une oui – non – peut-être pronouns: il, elle, ils, elles, tu, je, vous, nous, difference between tu and vous definition of infinitive tense, make sure that basic concept is understood. être, ...


9

Les corpus ESLO (Enquête socio-linguistique orléanaise) 1 et 2, aussi connu sous le nom de corpus d'Orléans est le plus grand corpus de français oral. Il est transcrit et partiellement étiqueté. La version 1 date des années 60, la version 2 des environs de 2010. En ce qui concerne les travaux sur les parties du discours le French Treebank de l'équipe d'Anne ...


9

C’est l’usage qui crée ce type d’abréviation. Le but est probablement à l’origine d’économiser d’une part le nombre de caractères (160 par SMS, longtemps facturés par message) et d’autre part le temps de frappe (écrire avec un clavier de téléphone était long). Si ces abréviations ne sont pas codifiées, elles souvent sont le fruits : de suppressions de ...


8

This may be off-topic (downvote if you think so!) but I think books are just as useful for learning a language as movies, if not more so. I especially recommend the Harry Potter series, for the following reasons: It was written for children, so it's fairly easy to understand, especially the first two books. It's very long (the English version is about ...


8

Le premier outil qui me vient à l'esprit est Dialang qui permet de tester le vocabulaire, mais pas uniquement. C'est un outil de diagnostic basé sur les niveaux du CECR mais n'est pas un outil de certification. Nécessite une connexion à internet et de s'enregistrer mais c'est entièrement gratuit. Je tiens à préciser que ce n'est pas réservé au Français et ...


7

Voici quelques références, dont la première semble correspondre précisément à tes critères de recherche: La diversité du français et l’enseignement de la langue en Afrique, Paris : L’Harmattan, 2004, 180 p. de KWOFIE Emmanuel Cet ouvrage présente des études sur le français en Francophonie, d’une part les rapports entre le français d’Afrique et la langue ...


7

I'd strongly suggest finding a local group that speaks French socially, and going along! Meetup.com is a good way to do this, but it isn't the only way to find groups. (It just so happens to be very strong on French language groups near where I live, which is why I know about it). Once you've located a nearby group that welcomes people at your level, go ...


7

Tu auras du mal à trouver des manuels scolaires directement téléchargeables à cause des problèmes de copyright. Mais tu pourras peut-être trouver quelque chose qui t'intéresse à partir du portail FLE (Français Langue Étrangère) Le Point du FLE. Dans la rubrique activités il y a de nombreuses adresses probablement intéressantes. J'ai repéré ces deux là : ...


6

http://www.linguee.fr is great for human translations of common and even not so common phrases within the context they occur, it searches translations that are on the web.


6

An excellent free online resource is skype or MSN. You can find language exchange contacts free at http://www.mylanguageexchange.com/ I have made some great French friends chatting face to face on skype (I recommend you use a camera). We've even holidayed with each other. It's a fantastic way to make new friends and improve your French and English (or ...


6

If poetry is inside your search span, I'd suggest reading Jacques Prévert's poems. No need to be an excellent french reader to read most of them. But it definitely needed a true genius to write them in the first place. Now two examples to match Nikana's expectations (I'm kidding but you were right of course). First, this one moment of sheer perfection and ...


6

Pour ajouter à la liste d'@Un francophone je conseille de visiter frengly.com - facile et qui traduit bien à mon avis. To add to the list of @Un francophone I would recommend frengly.com - easy to use and it seems to work well enough for most things - providing that you can read enough to spot the typical machine translation faults.


6

Try audiobooks! I don't know why I didn't think about them earlier but they perfectly fit your request in a certain way, doesn't it? You can buy the book to read it while you listen to the narrator. I know there are several audiobooks out there. Personally, I had the first Harry Potter (in French of course) when I was younger.


5

Il me semble que la meilleure méthode consiste à lire du français quotidiennement. La lecture apporte une intuition grammaticale et linguistique irremplaçable, permet de rencontrer de nombreux idiomes, renforce le vocabulaire, c'est on ne peut plus précieux. Pour "personnaliser" le résultat, tu pourras souhaiter d'orienter le choix de tes lectures, soit ...


5

Having the same issue in the opposite way, the best advice I have is to rely on Wikipedia's interwiki, both for the style and for the vocabulary. Try to read the same proof in French and in English and to see how sentences and symbols map1, if you need a translation of a word, look at the article in (en), then follow the interwiki to (fr). It works for ...


5

This answer will be a non-answer: there aren't any. There are resources that will help you learn French, but it's impossible to learn it completely online to the level you described. If you really need or want to learn French, you absolutely must (in decreasing order of preference) move to a French-speaking country, make several French-speaking friends, or ...


5

If you are really serious (meaning you can stick with it), I suggest French In Action (FIA), which can be found on YouTube and other places, including here at learner.org. It consists of a total of 52 half-hour episodes, for 26 hours of language immersion. It is well worth going through them all. If you know absolutely no French, you should look into ...


5

Le Trésor de la Fangue Française informatisé a une interface qui permet une saisie phonétique.


5

Google Translate is a pretty good resource for easy translations. The translator of Dictionary.com can be a good one too


5

Le Littré is a well known french dictionary, download its freeware here. Le Robert is another well known french dictionary, you can download it here (10 days trial).


5

There is an old TV show from the late 70's that was made in Ontario (for the channel TVO) for English speakers to help them learn French. It's called "Parlez-moi" and feats Marc Favreau. The sketches are about real life situations. Marc Favreau first tells people the expressions and their translations then there's a sketch using these expressions. You can ...


5

Here are some observations while learning French. The French spoken by native French is very fast. For beginners its very hard to catch up. Also the pronunciation is not always clear or sometimes there is no distinction between two words. As our brain is not trained yet for these sound patterns, for beginners its hard to understand. For beginners, I would ...



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