New answers tagged

2

Si la subordonnée introduite par tel que est une subordonnée de comparaison, l'emploi de l'indicatif est nécessaire dans celle-ci. Dans ce cas tel que exprime la similitude ou introduit un exemple, tel que je viens de l'écrire. En revanche, si la subordonnée introduite est une subordonnée de conséquence, c'est le subjonctif qui est requis dans la ...


1

La seconde est la bonne forme, la première est incorrecte. La règle dépasse les mathématiques: phrase d'action + tel que (dans le sens de but) => subjonctif dans la seconde phrase. Ce lien fournit tout une série d'exemples: http://www.bertrandboutin.ca/Folder_151_Grammaire/C_b_emploi_subj.htm On peut garder le même sens en remplaçant tel que par afin ...


1

La première sonne faux. Certains énoncés mathématiques peuvent être écrits comme ça, mais c'est une erreur. La seconde est correcte, et est la forme qui doit être utilisée: on prend y tel que x soit égal à 5 Explications (par Vincent G): Si la subordonnée introduite par tel que est une subordonnée de comparaison, l'emploi de l'indicatif est ...


3

This motto would translate to something akin to : May Concorde bring men closer. It loses a bit of meaning in the translation though : in French, Concorde also designates Concordia, the Roman goddess of agreement and peace. To elaborate on your sub-questions : There is no missing clause to indicate it's a command or prayer. The sentence is complete ...


3

A sentence starting with "Que" seems to be an equivalent to "May". You can find the same construction in Star Wars : Que la force soit avec toi May the force be with you Here: Que Concorde rapproche les hommes May Concorde allow people to get closer The problem here is to translate "rapprocher"... It litteraly means "make people be ...


1

All 1, 2 and 3 are all correct. Personal opinion: In spoken language, I would use 1 or 2, indifferently (2 sounds better, but 1 is shorter). In written language, I think I will systematically use 2. Concerning 2: after "à moins que", the "ne" (ne explétif) is usual. It is because "à moins que" indicates that the fact in the main sentence ("Je vais prendre ...


0

To summarize: Most formal: à moins que cela ne soit interdit. Less Formal: à moins que ce ne soit interdit. Slang: à moins que ça soit interdit.


2

According to the existing answers and commentaries, the answer to that question highly depends on who answers. Given that I don't agree with all I've read, I publish my own point of view. My answer is that all 3 forms are correct when speaking. If you write, I recommand you to use the second form, which is the most correct and formal in my opinion. ...


0

Indeed the subjunctive past tenses are nowadays only used in litterature and have become kinda obsolete in oral. Whereas the other romance languages have kept using them (Spanish, Portuguese, Italian people use them naturally in everyday's life) the subjonctif imparfait and subjonctif plus-que-parfait are never used when speaking, so that they are even ...


1

I suppose I should have done this quick research before posting a question. Apparently, the replacement is permissible because, according to the sources below, the replacement of imperfect subjective with present subjective is always permissible. I might add that French subjunctives, then, seem to behave differently from English or German subjunctives but ...


-1

pût is subjonctif imparfait. The subjonctif imparfait is used to tell the story, actions that advance the story. You can't use subjonctif présent. The present subjunctive is used to express present actions or ideas which are subjective. It is nearly always found in dependent clauses introduced by que or qui, and the subjects of the dependent and main ...


1

1 , 2 and 3 are correct. ce is less frequent. more frequent is: à moins que cela (ne) soit interdit. you can use them interchangeably. 2 is more stylish. 3: sauf si is more frequent in everyday speaking.


4

I'm not a good english speaker, but i'm French, so i can tell you my opinion ;) All your suggests are right, but the first one is more straightforward. Except as i would prefer: "Je vais prendre l'air. À moins que ça soit interdit, ça aussi ?" The second is a little bit complicated and not very used in everyday language. On the contrary, the third is not ...



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