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15

This may sound obvious, but avoid translated movies/series — pick ones which are natively in French. There aren't so many French series, though. A list of French television series is maintained on Wikipedia. I'd probably recommend starting with animated series. Being targeted at children, the language may be easier. The "Once upon a time..." (Il était une ...


14

Not exactly a series per se, but I found "Qui veut gagner des millions?" to be very interesting to watch to improve my own French. The questions (and answers) are comparable to the English version, with say 50% being cultural (which I mostly hadn't a clue on, but learned a lot from) and 50% being general knowledge (which I knew or could guess at in English), ...


8

Je proposerais feuilleton à l'eau de rose, bien qu'on eût pu proposer aussi mélodrame, voire même mélo qui accentue l'accusation implicite de mièvrerie. Au Québec, le terme roman-savon existe, mais en France cette traduction plus littérale n'a pas pris, en tout cas je ne l'ai jamais entendue. (Simple remarque, en terme de connotations, une coïncidence ...


8

This may be off-topic (downvote if you think so!) but I think books are just as useful for learning a language as movies, if not more so. I especially recommend the Harry Potter series, for the following reasons: It was written for children, so it's fairly easy to understand, especially the first two books. It's very long (the English version is about ...


5

Here are some observations while learning French. The French spoken by native French is very fast. For beginners its very hard to catch up. Also the pronunciation is not always clear or sometimes there is no distinction between two words. As our brain is not trained yet for these sound patterns, for beginners its hard to understand. For beginners, I would ...


4

If you're fairly new to French, then I'd suggest you try watching easier French films with English subtitles on them. You want something that doesn't have a lot of slang (argot) in them. Comedy films often work well, as do quite a few RomComs. There are loads of films in this category that you can watch, so your easiest way is probably just to watch out for ...


4

I recommend you "Ma france" series by BBC. It's really a wonderful training programme. Visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french/mafrance/


4

"Plus belle la vie" is quite easy to follow. However, while it deals about everyday life, it is not about real life in Marseille, there are not that many murders there. :)


3

Bah, un feuilleton « à la Santa Barbara », je ne pense pas qu'on puisse faire plus clair en moins de mots. Tu peux aussi en choisir un autre dans la liste fournie sur Wikipédia, — hum… comment dire — a priori ils se valent tous… Le savon étant une référence aux sponsors et publicités, « soap opera » n'a de sens que par référence aux vielles séries. Donc ...


3

If you like humor you can watch "Kaamelot" ou "Caméra Café", but I think it's a bit complicated to understand for a novice.


2

There is a short radio program on "France Inter" which is called "qu'est-ce que tu me jactes". Each week, this radio program explains a French argot term. So you can download the podcast and listen to it, you will learn something in each program, it's quite interesting. I am French, and I learn something each time I listen to it. You can download it here.


2

I haven't watched the TV show, but from the "bande annonce", the language seems to be modern. As you observed, the formulations are a tad different, adapted to sound like 1800s. From the episode, I can clearly affirm that vocabulary is modern French. The sentence formulation could be used as it is in everyday life, but some time it would look "snooty". ...


1

I like to use the TV5 app in my mobile. It has a lot of videos in native French, most with the option to use subtitles and they are updated very often.


1

I found the game show “Mot de Passe” (on France 2, Saturday evening) a good TV programme for Intermediate level students of French language who may want to augment their 'contextual vocabulary'.



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