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4

L'exemple 1 est correct, mais plutôt à l'oral. Du coup, on utiliserait plutôt "quand" ou "dès que" plutôt que "lorsque" qui est un peu plus soutenu. L'exemple 2 est un peu maladroit : on utiliserait le futur antérieur "quand tu auras terminé ton rapport, tu me l'enverras". D'ailleurs, dans l'exemple 1, on utiliserait souvent le passé composé pour la ...


2

Here is an analyse of each of your propositions: "Il ne pleut plus depuis deux ans dans cette région." is correct. The slight difference between the present and the past is that the present contains the idea that the situation is not supposed to come to an end shortly. "Il n'a pas plu depuis deux ans dans cette région." is correct and a rather written ...


0

The most natural sounding depends on the context... I will distinguish here : a written context, where one thinks about the sentence before putting it on paper. All sentences starting with "Il" will fit in this category an oral context, where one needs to send out a message rather quickly. Sentences starting with "Cela" or "ça" Moreover, I would ...


2

The most natural would be: Ça fait deux ans qu'il n'a pas plu dans la région. or simply (if you are in that region): Ça fait deux ans qu'il [n']a pas plu ici. Il [n']a pas plu depuis deux ans ici. If you are not there: Ça fait deux ans qu'il [n']y a pas plu.


-2

In french, I am taking a exam = Je prends un examen. The verb prendre means to take. The verb passer means to pass. Je passe un examen means I pass a exam. Je prends un examen -I am taking a exam Je prenderai un examen - I will take an examen J'ai pris un examen -I took an exam Je suis fatigue et Je prends un pause. I am ...


0

If you want to say you just finished it Je viens de passer un examen If you want to say you're passing it right now Je suis en train de passer un examen If you want to say you are going to take an exam Je vais passer un examen French language is usually slightly more exact with timings and less flexible than english.


3

Je passe un examen Is right. Others mentioned: Je suis en examen That is also ok but can also mean I'm being charged with.. I want to add the simpler form: J'ai un examen That is the most popular use in spoken French and will be followed by a time indication, for example: J'ai un examen ce soir (I'm taking an exam tonight)


5

French has one present tense only. English has two (present simple and present continuous). Depending on context, the English present and present continuous always translate to the French present tense. There are some exceptions where one might use en train de, but there is no hard and fixed rule for this. I speak French every Tuesday at school = Je parle ...


14

Be+ing present is often translated with "en train de + verbe" structure, however it is a more heavy construction than it is in English, so it is not used when not necessary. For example: Que fais-tu ? - Je révise pour mon examen. Would be translated by: What are you doing ? - I'm rewiewing for my exam. And if your mom was calling you in the ...


18

If you want to use a present simple as in English, you use "passer", like "Je passe un examen", "tu passes un examen",... But if you want to use a present Be+ing, you should use "être en train de", like "Je suis en train de passer un examen", "tu es en train de passer un examen", etc... We use "être en train de" to describe an action that is happening. I ...


15

"Je passe un examen" is a correct form. "je suis passer..." is wrong. You can say "je vais passer un examen" to mean "I'm going to take an exam" or "j'ai passé un examen" to mean "I have taken an exam".


4

In complement to Von Kar's answer : I think you're misunderstanding the meaning of this sentence. Here, « a été long » means the prosecutor spent a long time talking about it. Like when you say "I won't be long", you mean that you won't take much time to do whatever you have to do, not that you will lose a few centimeters (except perhaps in some very ...


0

In french i would say "Je l'aurais eu si tu n'avais pas tout gâché, comme d'habitude." I am not english native, then I might have misunderstood your sentence. I understood "Without you always ruining everything!" as, if the subject used to ruin everything he tries to manage If "Without you always ruining everything!" means, that the subject ruined this ...


1

I'm mostly surprised by the numerous bad translations proposed: "pour toujours tout ruiner", "à toujours tout ruiner" : this sounds obscure in good French. The correct French verb, here, is not "ruiner", but "gâcher": "Je l'aurais eu, sans toi qui gâches toujours tout".


0

I would say: "je l'aurais eu sans toi qui ruines toujours tout !" It's less literary though more elegant (it's an alexandrine...).


1

After having delivered hasty and thus unprecise analyses, I have calmly considered the problem you raised: It shows you're quite keen at French, because indeed you detected a mistake: I can affirm that, in that sentence, Alexandre Dumas effectively made a mistake (but after all, the law "errare humanum est" can apply even to a great author, can't it?). ...


0

I believe this is conditionnel passé II simply because it is not a "que" construct, and does not express a desire, wish, emotion, obligation, doubt or uncertainty. Using the imparfait in this case would be equivalent to using the conditionel présent, and would be incorrect. The other option you have is to use the conditionel passé I, or "comme si elles ...


1

The imparfait is the correct choice. As a rule of thumb, imparfait can be used to speak of events that spanned a substantial period of time in the past, while passé composé can be used to refer to specific events in the past. Eg: Imparfait: "Je jouais au football quand j'habitais à Paris" Passé composé: "J'ai joué au football avant-hier"


6

If it's a past habit : use imparfait. À l'époque, j'allais au magasin tous les jours. "A l'époque" seems to span over a long time, and hence express a habit. Passé composé would be a meaningful candidate too if you were not starting with "à l'époque". If it was not a habit, but just a series of occurences over a short interval of time, like in "I fell ...


1

I would change the previous sentences slightly. I'd much rather say "Je l'aurais eu, sans toi pour toujours tout ruiner !" So "pour" instead of "à" and the order of the next words makes more sense. As for "Without +pronoun verb +ing" it translates to "présent du subjonctif" e.g. "Sans que tu ne fasses" ("Without you doing") -> Sans + que + pronom + verbe ...


1

No. As I see it it could be what would say a villain seeing his plan failing. He could say: "Je l'aurais eu, sans toi à ruiner toujours tout !" Splitting the sentence is weird in French, keep it as a single sentence. "Je l'aurais eu, sans toi à toujours ruiner tout !" Is correct too, but sounds less like the nasty guy whining, and a bit weirder too.


3

If the context makes it clear that you are not talking about a habit but about something you were doing in a precise instant, you use the imparfait: I was having a good time -> Je passais un bon moment. This morning I was having a drink when... -> Ce matin, je buvais (une boisson), quand... (as "boire" contains already the idea of drinking, you ...


0

In french, continuous tenses are translated by "être en train de", so your examples become: J'étais en train de me faire tuer J'étais en train de me faire intimider J'étais en train de passer un merveilleux moment Not that number 3 is very different from number 1 and 2. In 1 and 2, it is a passive form, so in french, you could also say : On ...



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