Hot answers tagged

19

Le français ne permet pas de passer d'un nom à un adjectif ou à un verbe aussi facilement que l'anglais. Il n'est par ailleurs pas possible de construire un nouveau mot en en accolant deux. Dès lors, je propose l'emploi d'un adjectif existant mais qui s'applique tout à fait à votre exemple (bien que plus générique): un titre racoleur ce terme n'est pas ...


9

Certes, le français « chez-soi », et ses dérivés, n'a pas la charge émotionnelle que peut parfois avoir l'anglais home mais le français dispose de plusieurs noms pour exprimer ce concept et on pourra parfois préférer un autre mot que « chez-soi » selon le contexte. Chez-soi (n.m.) (qui va se décliner avec le pronom approprié) est peut-être le plus neutre ...


7

Your sentence is perfectly correct, but you could use the alternative: L'idée même d'un vêtement bizarre n'existe pas dans l'esprit londonien. The difference is mostly stylistic, there is no real difference in meaning. It could be translated word-by-word to "the very idea of strange clothes doesn't exist in the londonian spirit."


6

To the extent that “nailed it” can mean “spot-on,” you could use “{être} En plein dans le mille” [here sarcastically] for the doughnut caption (from ‘Reverso’), but negating this for the Londoner example would be awkward, so for that you could consider “{être toujours} à côté de la plaque” (also from ‘Reverso’). "Aussi doués qu'ils puissent être, il y a un ...


6

The easiest and shortest way is to simply start your sentence with "étudiant" : Étudiant, je sortais tous les soirs. "Quand j'étais étudiant" also works, but "en tant qu'étudiant" has a slightly different meaning ; it means that your status as a student causes or enables whatever comes next. En tant qu'étudiant, j'avais 25% de réduction sur mes ...


6

Si j'ai bien compris le concept, il s'agit simplement d'arroseurs arrosés. L'expression est particulièrement pertinente dans ce contexte puisqu'il s'agit du titre d'un des tous premiers films de l'histoire du cinéma.


5

Although “tumultueux/euse” is probably used more often to describe such years or eras in world history or to describe someone’s entire life (as in the title of this film) than it is to describe a particular part of someone’s life, this entry from Word Reference makes a connection between that French adjective and hectic: tumultueux adj littéraire ...


5

Tout à fait d'accord avec la réponse acceptée (titre "racoleur") qui est obligatoire si le contexte est formel et qui sera comprise dans tous les cas. J'ajouterais que "putassier" (Qui est racoleur et indigne.) peut également faire l'affaire, si le titre est non seulement racoleur mais également trivial est bas. Cependant, ces deux termes étaient déjà ...


4

Yes, 'faire' comes handy in a lot of situations. It can be a replacement for 'do', 'make' (please edit if you see other words).If you don't know how to say something otherwise, feel free to use it. However, please do remember that, because it is a general word, it is vague. Therefore, as much as possible, try to be more specific when you want to say ...


4

If the idea (and not just the thing behind the idea) that you’re referring to has been mentioned earlier, you could perhaps further emphasize the “no such idea” notion with "Une telle idée (d’un vêtement bizarre) n'existe même pas." (example of usage from ‘Psychiatrische en Neurologische Bladen, Volume 5’ via ‘Google Books’) To fit “un tel/une telle” ...


4

About n'existe même pas, the expression matches "there is no such thing" (more precisely "doesn't even exist"). I would have preferred this slightly modified sentence: L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. or L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre ne viendrait même pas à l'esprit d'un ...


4

You cannot really use the same word to translate "to nail" in both "As good as they may be, there's an aspect Londoners cannot quite nail" and the picture, because they carrying different meaning. In the sentence, it means "to understand something/to get the meaning of something right", and corresponding slang would be "capter" or "piger". Depending on the ...


3

L'anglais permet de transformer à peu près n'importe quel nom en adjectif (exemple : a blue-eyed girl, le mot eyed signifiant aux yeux). En français, ce n'est pas le cas. Je propose donc : Je trouve que le titre incite au clic. On a changé le titre, parce qu'au final il attirait peut-être trop le clic.


3

For the last sentence, "saisir" carry the meaning, without the familiar register: Aussi doués qu'ils soient, il y a un aspect que les londoniens ne saisiront jamais. (As good as they may be, there's an aspect Londoners will never truly succeed to understand/achieve) The expression "avoir tout bon / avoir tout juste" is more familiar and is less linked ...


3

The verb is s'attendre à and not attendre. Construction with s'attendre à is : "s'attendre à ce que* + verb in the subjunctive". You are right, pour cannot be used here. "Exist" is exister in French. We can't use être in this case. Your sentence expresses regret. French uses the infinitive of the verb (and not a conjugated verb) in interrogative ...


3

En fait, "instant karma fail" comporte deux parties distinctes : "instant karma" et "fail". "instant karma" -> "instant karmic retribution" -> retour de karma instantané. Le retour de karma est un coup du sort qui punit celui qui a mal agit (ou plus rarement récompense celui qui a bien agit). Le fait qu'il soit instantané lui donne un effet cocasse. Pour ...


3

En français, on peut parler de karma dans les situations qui correspondent à celles des vidéos. C'est le karma! Mais ça reste une expression récente et qui n'est pas comprise par tous, il y a des chances de ne pas être compris si on essaie d'utiliser le mot karma. Mais il existe des expressions idiomatiques pour désigner exactement la même chose : ...


3

"Migrant" is a term englobing "immigré" and "émigré". It's similar to english, see this page : Emigrate means to leave one's country to live in another. Immigrate is to come into another country to live permanently. Migrate is to move, like bird in the winter. The choice between emigrate,immigrate, and migrate depends on the sentence's point of view. ...


2

Some further suggestions: il y a un aspect qui échappe toujours aux londoniens il y a un aspect qui reste hors de portée des londoniens il y a un aspect que les londoniens ne maîtrisent pas As for "nailed it, "parfait" might work, or "parfaite maîtrise".


2

I can't think of a direct translation to "nailed it", but "trop fort" might be a close substitute. It also works in the negative, as in "les londoniens ne sont pas trop forts au ____". I'm not sure how common it may be in France, but in Quebec it'll work fairly similarly.


2

Considering the most up-voted definition available in the Urban Dictionary "you completed a task successfully or got something right . ie :You nailed it to the cross", the closest translation would be réussi / nickel / parfait ! with "to nail" = réussir. Aussi doués qu'ils puissent être, il y a quelque chose que les londoniens ne peuvent pas réussir.


2

I think a direct translation of "There's no such thing" would be "Il n'y a rien de tel", and so you might say, En fait, il n'y a rien de tel dans l'esprit d'un londonien. Or synonyms of tel include pareil and semblable.


2

If you're looking for slang/real life oral French, a close approximation to "I nailed it" would be "J'ai tout déchiré". It's the kind of thing one would answer to a friend (not to a superior) when asked "How did your exam/job interview go?". For the meme specifically, I guess in French we'd rather use "Excellent", "Parfait", "Impeccable", or variants like ...


2

En fait, l’idée d’un vêtement bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. La tournure est correcte, compréhensible et ne choque pas, mais n'est pas complètement idiomatique. Il y a juste une faute d'orthographe : un Londonien (les adjectifs de provenance géographique ne prennent pas de majuscule, mais les noms, si). On peut déplacer ...


2

This is to my knowledge an incorrect translation. Google Translate is highly unreliable. The correct translation is: "The tree is taller than the flower." The word grand could either mean taller or bigger in either a non-physical or a physical way. It really depends on the sentence and in this particular case both could work. But I think they meant big as ...


2

Although it’s possibly not the kind of “home” that you’re asking about, I think that sometimes “home” is used in English phrases (and song/movie titles) like “Home sweet home”/“There’s no place like home” /”Home is where the heart is”/(Sweet Home Alabama) to mean not the physical family residence, but rather the country/region/state/city of one’s birth, and ...


2

Context: talking about a very agitated period of s.o.'s life, possibly a bad one. You can use « mouvementé » then. This is the most appropriate word French speakers would use. For instance : « une période mouvementée » (when refering to someone's life).


2

According to what I found here I'd translate to: "frénétique" or "intense"


2

Pour moi il ne faut pas essayer d'associer "karma" et "fails" en traduisant "échecs de karma". On a deux choses : un "fail" c'est un littéralement un échec, je traduirais "un raté" ou "plantage". C'est très utilisé pour décrire un style de vidéos où on voit des gens faire des ratés plus ou moins spectaculaires. "Karma" c'est à prendre comme l'effet qu'ont ...


2

As far as I understand, the sentence does not give information about the "winner" (you have translated it by "lauréat" which is correct) but only that the scholarship has been awarded. So the beginning would be "Bourse XYZ attribuée" "après sélection de 1000 candidats" is not correct as you said because I think the candidates have already applied to intend ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible