New answers tagged

1

Although it’s possibly not the kind of “home” that you’re asking about, I think that sometimes “home” is used in English phrases (and song/movie titles) like “Home sweet home”/“There’s no place like home” /”Home is where the heart is”/(Sweet Home Alabama) to mean not the physical family residence, but rather the country/region/state/city of one’s birth, and ...


7

Certes, le français « chez-soi », et ses dérivés, n'a pas la charge émotionnelle que peut parfois avoir l'anglais home mais le français dispose de plusieurs noms pour exprimer ce concept et on pourra parfois préférer un autre mot que « chez-soi » selon le contexte. Chez-soi (n.m.) (qui va se décliner avec le pronom approprié) est peut-être le plus neutre ...


0

Well, chez moi/chez soi can indeed have quite a strong emotinal connotation, but not as strong as home I would say. For instance, we don't a home sweet home thing... I would say we put more emphasis on the meaning than on the word when we want to express the 'little girl in Oz' feeling.


0

"Ne pas manquer [qqch]" me vient en tête (ex. "je l'ai pas manqué"), qui a une signification particulière au-delà de la négation de "manquer". À mon avis ça s'assemble avec le registre informel de dire "nailed it".


0

Cela dépend des cas: Je fais ça (ou fais cela qui est plus soutenu) est la forme très courante, pour remplacer : n'importe quelle action concrète: Je casse des briques. affirmation : Tu racontes des histoires ? oui, je fais ça. Cela s'emploie moins naturellement (mais c'est acceptable et compréhensible) pour: des pensées ou actions non concrètes : Tu ...


0

I am arriving a little late to get my answer to be really useful, but anyway I think (I am a French, from France, and I recently arrived in the United States in order to work and study, and I am subsequently having a hard time to do not make too much proof of evidences in English, as a french who knows better 'readen'-English than how communicative English ...


1

For what seems to be your main question, “cerner” (D. 2) comes very close in terms of figurative and literal meaning alike. Aussi doués qu'ils peuvent être, il y a un aspect que les Londoniens n’arriveront jamais vraiment à cerner. Concerning the sarcastic use, I would go for “ça c'est fait”, a well-known meme-ish locution which would be identically ...


1

"Mettre le doigt sur quelque chose" could be used for "getting something right". Aussi doués qu'ils puissent être, il y a un aspect sur lequel les londoniens n'arrivent pas vraiment à mettre le doigt. You also keep the figurative meaning of "pinning something somewhere".


1

I can also thing of another way, in the same manner as duck cake pic, saying 'Nickel !', like the metal, is a short way of expressing a spotless victory, something done without errors.


2

En fait, l’idée d’un vêtement bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. La tournure est correcte, compréhensible et ne choque pas, mais n'est pas complètement idiomatique. Il y a juste une faute d'orthographe : un Londonien (les adjectifs de provenance géographique ne prennent pas de majuscule, mais les noms, si). On peut déplacer ...


0

The answers I have seen so far are good, however "Nailed it" is slang, so I would suggest something of the same language level, such as: "Trop bien géré", which also includes the touch of irony.


1

Would you is equal to Voudrais-vous exactly, because the you personal pronoun is vous in French.


3

Yes, 'faire' comes handy in a lot of situations. It can be a replacement for 'do', 'make' (please edit if you see other words).If you don't know how to say something otherwise, feel free to use it. However, please do remember that, because it is a general word, it is vague. Therefore, as much as possible, try to be more specific when you want to say ...


-3

En fait, l’idée qu’un vêtement si bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien.


2

I think a direct translation of "There's no such thing" would be "Il n'y a rien de tel", and so you might say, En fait, il n'y a rien de tel dans l'esprit d'un londonien. Or synonyms of tel include pareil and semblable.


2

If you're looking for slang/real life oral French, a close approximation to "I nailed it" would be "J'ai tout déchiré". It's the kind of thing one would answer to a friend (not to a superior) when asked "How did your exam/job interview go?". For the meme specifically, I guess in French we'd rather use "Excellent", "Parfait", "Impeccable", or variants like ...


4

If the idea (and not just the thing behind the idea) that you’re referring to has been mentioned earlier, you could perhaps further emphasize the “no such idea” notion with "Une telle idée (d’un vêtement bizarre) n'existe même pas." (example of usage from ‘Psychiatrische en Neurologische Bladen, Volume 5’ via ‘Google Books’) To fit “un tel/une telle” ...


0

One possible option is to use the negation point. It basically means not at all. It's hard to find support for this claim on Wordreference, but I have seen this form of empahsis used often, at least in a literary context. L’idée d’un vêtement bizarre n’existe point


2

Some further suggestions: il y a un aspect qui échappe toujours aux londoniens il y a un aspect qui reste hors de portée des londoniens il y a un aspect que les londoniens ne maîtrisent pas As for "nailed it, "parfait" might work, or "parfaite maîtrise".


2

I can't think of a direct translation to "nailed it", but "trop fort" might be a close substitute. It also works in the negative, as in "les londoniens ne sont pas trop forts au ____". I'm not sure how common it may be in France, but in Quebec it'll work fairly similarly.


4

You cannot really use the same word to translate "to nail" in both "As good as they may be, there's an aspect Londoners cannot quite nail" and the picture, because they carrying different meaning. In the sentence, it means "to understand something/to get the meaning of something right", and corresponding slang would be "capter" or "piger". Depending on the ...


6

To the extent that “nailed it” can mean “spot-on,” you could use “{être} En plein dans le mille” [here sarcastically] for the doughnut caption (from ‘Reverso’), but negating this for the Londoner example would be awkward, so for that you could consider “{être toujours} à côté de la plaque” (also from ‘Reverso’). "Aussi doués qu'ils puissent être, il y a un ...


-1

I would say something like: Il n'existe pas quelque chose de bizarre comme ... I have never heard about the "l’idée d’un vêtement bizarre n’existe même pas", but it is easy to understand the meaning for French speakers.


2

Considering the most up-voted definition available in the Urban Dictionary "you completed a task successfully or got something right . ie :You nailed it to the cross", the closest translation would be réussi / nickel / parfait ! with "to nail" = réussir. Aussi doués qu'ils puissent être, il y a quelque chose que les londoniens ne peuvent pas réussir.


2

For the last sentence, "saisir" carry the meaning, without the familiar register: Aussi doués qu'ils soient, il y a un aspect que les londoniens ne saisiront jamais. (As good as they may be, there's an aspect Londoners will never truly succeed to understand/achieve) The expression "avoir tout bon / avoir tout juste" is more familiar and is less linked ...


4

About n'existe même pas, the expression matches "there is no such thing" (more precisely "doesn't even exist"). I would have preferred this slightly modified sentence: L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. or L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre ne viendrait même pas à l'esprit d'un ...


6

Your sentence is perfectly correct, but you could use the alternative: L'idée même d'un vêtement bizarre n'existe pas dans l'esprit londonien. The difference is mostly stylistic, there is no real difference in meaning. It could be translated word-by-word to "the very idea of strange clothes doesn't exist in the londonian spirit."


1

In French, ami(e) and copain/copine can correspond to friend in English, depending on the context. Etymologically, un(e) ami(e) is someone you love/like (amo, as, are in Latin -> Aimer/ to love) whereas un copain/une copine is someone you share pain [=bread] with. In France, the relationship you have with a person can determine whether it's your copain ...


-1

Would you = Voudrais-tu ? (singular) Voudriez-vous (more than one person addressing) Want to dance = Veux-tu danser ?


2

In case you ever stop by Québec (Canada) afterwards, and wonder why it's different.1 There you will find, for example: TP (très petit) [XS] P (petit) [S] M (moyen) [M] G (grand) [L] TG (très grand) [XL] TTG (très très grand) [XXL] For instance I've found M/M on a sweater with equal font size : usually you'll have the French/English abbreviation on ...


1

The previous answer is quite good but I want to make something precise. You can just say "jusqu'à la troisième". This will mean "until the end of la troisième" I would say like this : "On doit étudier toutes les matières jusqu'à la troisième. Ensuite, on peut choisir entre les sciences économiques et la technologie, mais c'est obligatoire d' étudier les ...


2

You can use the infinitive form, like Jiliagre explained: remplir le dossier pour la Sécu rendre son saladier à la voisine You can also use the imperative: fais la vaisselle pense à sortir les poubelles surveille ton petit frère désamorcez la bombe du secteur 8 empêchez les ennemis de rentrer dans la ville rassemblez cinq coquilles rouges et ...


1

For a personnal TODO list, I would use a more familiar expressions "Dodo". It assumes no one would read it but you. A second point is how to say "10pm". If there may be any confusion, you should better say "22h" to remove any ambiguity. 22h: dodo 22h: (Aller) [me/se] coucher (kind of too serious in my opinion) Dodo is familiar and gives a childhood ...


14

In France, you will use different expressions depending on the cloth For shirts : XS S M L XL You would say something like : -Tu mets quelle taille de T-shirt ? -Moi ? du L pourquoi ? You may use the full words "Small", "Medium", etc... but I think it is less common. For pants You will use a number instead : 36 ...


2

I would use the infinitive in a todo list. "go to bed" is better translated by the more idiomatic "aller se coucher" than "aller au lit". As se coucher is pronominal, the form will depend on who the todo list is directed to, e.g.: Generic: Se coucher à 10h. To yourself: Me coucher à 10h. To one kid: Te coucher à 10h. To several kids: Vous ...


6

Usually one says "jusqu'à ..." (until) or "à partir de ..." (starting from). I think "jusqu'à partir de la troisième" might be grammatically correct in theory, meaning "until one leaves la troisième" but a native speaker would never say that as it is ambiguous. If you mean "until leaving", I'd say (with increasing preference) jusqu'à la fin de la troisième, ...


1

La cantine/elle est nouvelle et climatisée. La cantine/elle est nouvelle et a l'air conditionné.


0

In addition to "grandir" given by Anne Aunyme, you could use "vieillir" (literally "to age", "to grow old") See this definition (in french), or this one (in english).


4

You can use "grandir" (to grow): Les enfants sont toujours impatients de grandir, de pouvoir se coucher tard et conduire une voiture. Of course it is more vague than the English "to grow up", but the precision will have to be given by the context.


2

In my experience, only saying "climatisé(e)" is just fine if the context is understood. When you use "C'est," your subject becomes neutral. So even though you're referring to the 'cantine,' you would say: C'est nouveau et climatisé. But you could also say, after already referring to the 'cantine' : Elle est nouvelle et climatisée.


8

La retranscription du texte de votre image est la suivante : En hommage de très vive reconnaissance de la part de la paroisse St Antoine à Charleroi (Ville-Basse) pour le pieux et admirable dévouement de Monsieur et Madame Braeckman. Que Notre-Dame au Rempart de Charleroi les protège. Le curé les bénit de tout cœur. Le message est ...


4

Partis means "factions", so "spouses" seems an excellent choice of words since factions were made through alliances and marriages. In the translation of songs and poetry, prosody has to be taken into account ("spouses" rhymes with "glasses" and "lilies" – the lily was the French symbol of royalty). Chantons en vrais amis literally means "Let's sing as if we ...


0

Il peut y avoir confusion car il y a plusieurs constructions. par nature est une locution adverbiale = par essence, par tempérament. Par nature, je suis idiot. Elle est par nature éphémère. de nature est équivalent, mais plus rare. On peut aussi trouver de nature + adjectif lié à nature pris comme substantif: de nature fragile = de constitution ...


1

Les deux expressions sont synonymes mais pas toujours interchangeables. « De nature » précède le qualificatif (ex: « de nature internationale » mais pas « internationale de nature ») alors que « par nature » peut être placé avant, après ou en apposition (« Étant, par nature, une école internationale, ... »). C'est cette dernière forme qui me semble la plus ...


0

I would rather naturally say "Solution de partage de fichiers enterprise" or "Solution de partage de fichiers pour l'entreprise", or more generally "outil collaboratif entreprise". I see Citrix Sharefile calls itself a "solution de partage et de synchronisation de fichiers d'entreprise (EFSS)". Frenchmen seem to not be as attached to acronyms as Americans, ...


1

Le plus naturel serait Système de fichiers partagés ou répliqués. remarque 1: le partage / la synchronisation sont des raffinements qui vont souvent de pair. remarque 2: en français, on omet souvent "pour les entreprises" pour les technologies informatiques, on rajoute "pour les particuliers / personnel" quand la solution est différente (souvent moins ...


3

Short answer : you don't. A bit longer answer : you need to find another way of phrasing the same idea. Anything will do, really. "I can't go without you having eaten breakfast" can also be phrased as "I can't go if you haven't eaten breakfast." "As you haven't eaten breakfast, I can't go." "I can't go because you haven't eaten breakfast." "I can't go ...


0

I misunderstood. can be Je n'ai pas compris. J'ai mal compris. Je me suis mépris (formal) misunderstood (adjective) can be mal compris incompris mécompris (formal) The Micromégas answer seems to be the best to me D'être mal compris


2

Il n'existe pas d'expression standard pour qualifier un "internet friend" Il faut utiliser une périphrase : "Un ami/Une connaissance d'internet" "Un ami/Une connaissance connu sur internet" "Un ami/Une connaissance sur internet" Eviter : "ami virtuel". On dit "relation virtuelle" pour qualifier une relation avec un ami d'internet. Mais hors contexte, ...


1

Pour ma part, je dirais plutôt un « ami virtuel ». C'est ce qu'il me semble le plus entendu. De plus, tout comme « internet friend », nous avons un nom + adjectif, contrairement à « ami sur internet » ou « un ami d'internet ».



Top 50 recent answers are included