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I generally try to avoid Latin phrases, but when I encounter “quid pro quo” in English, I generally interpret it, perhaps wrongly, as capturing the notion of “the reciprocation/return of favors/actions” and my two preferred informal/familiar phrases for expressing this notion are: “scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours” (always for favors) and “tit for tat” ...


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Puisqu'il s'agit d'une locution latine, elle être utilisée telle quelle, et elle l'est de temps à autre. Il n'y a cependant pas de « traduction standard » pour quid pro quo. Toute locution qui rend l'idée d'un échange quelconque passe. Une expression possible est donnant donnant. Donnant donnant En emploi de gérondif, loc. proverbiale. Pour ...


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In that specific context I would use "ça me saoûle" although it doesn't qualify the cold-calling action but the effect it has on me. Otherwise, "c'est naze", or "c'est relou" apply well. At least here in Paris.


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You mention that it sucks and that it's a drag as in boring/annoying, or maybe a chore. I noted it doesn't necessarily suck ass/real bad in context. It may piss the person off or not. In so many words, there are many possible choices depending on whether you focus on qualifying what cold calling is or how people react to that. A few suggestions, mostly about ...


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"C'est de la merde" works perfectly as well when you speak about an activity, a show, a movie, etc...


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So after thinking about it for a few days, I came up with "Dur dur le phoning" I think this conveys the message I'm looking to translate.


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First, let me say I am not sure if an official specific french word has been made for that. French tends to keep a lot of English words when it comes to computer science. However, I found in this article ( un premier superordinater avant 2020 ) the terms : "super ordinateur de classe Exascale", ou encore "ordinateur exaflopique". Pas de traduction littérale ...


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It would translate as 'ça craint' or 'c'est nul'. For an activity, you could very well say "c'est chiant".


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"Tu me tues"... Si on est énervé, ça voudra dire qu'on est vraiment à bout de la personne à qui on s'adresse, qu'on en a vraiment marre d'elle. Si on est entre amis et qu'il y en a un qui nous fait beaucoup rire, on peut dire "Ha ha ha tu me tues" (en riant très fort à en avoir mal au ventre en général). :) En Belgique en tout cas, ça s'entend, surtout ...


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Non ! Plutôt : "j'ai plein de questions" ou "j'ai un tas de questions"


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Je programme en Grande Bretagne et Boilerplate introduit également un aspect ennuyeux et sans grand intérêt intrinsèque. Je propose donc du code bateau ... c'est a dire banal, sans intérêt autre que sa nécessité au fonctionnement du programme. Notez que je ne sais pas si cela s'utilise dans le monde info en France.


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No, bizarre would not really fit here. The example you proposed would be translated as "I have an odd question" or literally, "I have a bizarre question". Also to avoid here : "une question aléatoire" (= randomly chosen from a given set of questions) or "une question hasardeuse" (= dangerous in some way, sometimes figuratively, i.e. hard to solve ...


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One can also say “J'en ai marre de toi”, which is like to say “I can't bear you anymore”.


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i'm french and i agree with "espérons que" (let's hope that...). - sorry i can't comment nor vote Papa Poule's answer up yet because i don't have enough reputation. There is no word to translate "hopefully" literally and i think you should avoid to stick to find one, but construct the sentence differently (with "espérons que")


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Probably less idiomatic than the first two good answers and their comments, but I often use the imperative/suggestive form “Espérons que” to express the notion of “hopefully”/(“Let’s hope that …"): “Espérons que tout ira/aille bien” (But if you’re all alone talking or thinking to yourself [and you don’t have a tapeworm], I suppose this plural notion might ...


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I think @servabat is right. Another way would be to reformulate the whole sentence. On peut espérer que... En espérant que... J'ai bon espoir de... Il y a fort à parier que...


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“Avec un peu de chance” is to me most idiomatic way to translate “hopefully”. I never saw “avec espoir” used actually, and well even if it doesn't seems like it is, “avec un peu de chance” is often used, and perfectly accurate.


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in the sense of "what you do is too much for me", you can also use : Tu m'exaspères which is more formal


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Reading the original makes sense for literature (and journalism), but not for reading works of science. I wouldn't want to read Marcel Pagnol in English (bought a translation for a girlfriend once - disaster), but I think you'll be alright with Lagrange!


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Si vous voulez dire "you are making me die of laughter", au Quebec on pourrait dire "Tu me fais cramper"; Si vous voulez dire "you are destroying me physically, change what you're doing", on pourrait dire "Je ne suis plus capable" ou "J'suis plus/pu capable"; Mais on voit plutôt souvent le sens que relate Urban Dictionary "tu bousilles mes chances, détruit ...


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Un petit régionalisme de mon enfance pour la route ; à Bordeaux, on disait à l'époque : Mon sang par terre !


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One would say in French : Tu me tues, as you said (which, depending on the context, would be the most accurate translation) ; T'es pas croyable/T'es incroyable, which translates literally into You're incredible ; Tu me fais rêver or Tu m'envoies du rêve, those would be the most accurate translations of you're killing me regardless of the context ; Je n'en ...


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I think that reading in English would be easier for you, especially for that sort of things. Reading it in French would help you to get some scientific vocabulary in this domain (and God knows what a pain analytical mechanics is), but it should be easier for you to read the book in English, in order to grasp the concepts quickly. There should not be any ...


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My normally trusty source of French stands by her claim that gender neutrality already exists in French and that using the non-feminine forms of pronouns and adjectives is actually gender neutral, so I’m on my own with the following observations (and translation near the end): I’ve also noticed/used the singular “they” that you mention, but in my experience ...



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