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1

There are situations were using tu instead of vous (and even using vous instead of tu) is perceived to be insulting (a native speaker may very well intend to be insulting by doing so). For a visibly non native speaker, I'd fear a faux-pas less with higher up (who tend to be well traveled enough to understand the matter and are in position to give you the ...


0

Unless you are yourself a kid or talking to a kid, just use vous. Nobody will ever be outraged if you do it. Wait for the person you are talking with to suggest using tu ( « on peut se tutoyer » ) and don't take that initiative before being well aware with the level of familiarity required. As already stated, French canadians tend to have more relaxed ...


2

Roughly, use tu when you would be comfortable calling someone by their given name. Note that the French are more touchy about it than Quebecers (in the workplace, it's expected you'll use vous a lot more in France, whereas in Quebec you'll frequently be called tu by salespeople or waiters).


2

If I have to choose between those two options, I would go for "Il est de X" to make it less ambiguous since "il vient de X" can simply mean that he took the train/car/etc. from X. Furthermore using être show that it is truly part of him, i.e. it defines his character. You could also use "Il est originaire de X". That said, to be even less ambiguous I ...


1

Tu used inappropriately can be interpreted as a lack of respect by certain people. It would be the equivalent of being overly friendly with a senior manager you haven't met yet. The person would probably not be insulted per se but will probably think that you do not respect their status. If the context is you being a tourist it would not be weird if you ...


1

Short answer: It depends on who you are talking to. Long answer: If you respect the person, then vous is appropriate. If the person is a stranger, then use vous. Otherwise, it is perfectly fine to use tu. In addition, using tu is not an insult; vous is just more formal and slightly more polite. Using tu is certainly not the same as "cussing someone out" in ...


6

Comme décrit dans la réponse qui correspond à votre question il s'agit de l'action singulière d'un plan, et l'action de cette dernière peut être fractionnée dans le temps et dans des espaces différents. Sinon on dira moins le plan des actions à engager, que le programme des actions à engager. Le plan définit une architecture de l'action, le programme ...


9

Just to get a feeling for why such a meaning is possible, you can take it as meaning I have 16 years (of age under my belt). or think of it as similar to the past perfect tense in English (have+past participle), which links past and present I have (aged for) 16 years (and this is me now) If we take "copula" as the fancy term for "to be", and look ...


8

Because it's how one says ages in french. We can revert the question: Why is to be used instead of to have when expressing/referring to age, in english?


0

A possible explanation might be the underlying idea "Nous sommes arrivés à lundi (dans la série des jours de la semaine).


1

"faim" is a noun. You can't use it as an adjective. So only "J'ai faim" is correct. If you have heard "Je suis faim" then I assume it was said by speakers who speak French as a second or a foreign language and translate according a structure in their mother tongue "I am hungry" as "Je suis faim". But this is wrong as it means "I am hunger" and that makes no ...


0

Pour des expressions qui sont difficiles à expliquer logiquement ont a inventé le terme gallicisme. Bien sûr, ce n'est qu'un terme spécial pour ne pas avoir à dire: On ne peut pas l'expliquer. Il y a des années que j'essaie de trouver une explication pour le "du" dans "jouer du piano". Ma seule idée: jouer de la musique en se servant du piano. Mais cela ne ...


5

Pour un instrument de musique on dit bien « jouer de ». Mais c'est jouer de + l'instrument de musique précédé de l'article défini. Jouer de la guitare. Jouer du piano (de+le est obligatoirement contracté en du). Jouer des castagnettes. (de+les → des) L'utilisation de de ou d'une autre préposition dépend du verbe ou de la locution verbale, on ...


0

Note that in Québec we often say: "Je suis fin" or "Tu es fin (tu es fine)." But it has a very different meaning. That means: "I am/you are cool/nice/friendly." Also we can say "il n'est pas très fin". That means he is a little stupid. But as you see, even if "fin" is pronounced like "faim", it doesn't have the same meaning! Also, I'm not sure if this is ...


7

Yes, there is a big difference between the two: "je suis faim" makes no sense in French. What you were taught in high school most likely didn't suggest that the proper way to say "I'm hungry" is "j'ai faim"; it probably stated it. And it was right. You could look in a dictionary and see that "faim" is literally "hunger". So yes, in French you "have ...


5

Faim is more like hunger (although I have hunger doesn't look idiomatic) so only J'ai faim is valid, je suis faim is impossible. I'm very hungry would be J'ai très faim. You might also say Je suis affamé which is slightly stronger than I am very hungry.


0

On rencontre parfois « bi-circadien » ou « bicircadien », employé surtout pour désigner le rythme d'alternance éveil/sommeil souvent observé chez des individus placés dans un environnement sans référence temporelle.


1

Faute de mieux… Il semble qu'en vieux langage médical (cf. 1, 2, 3, etc.), après quotidien vient tierce (tous les deux jours) puis quarte (tous les trois jours), quinte, etc. La définition apparait dans le TLF, qui semble indiquer que le terme est employé uniquement dans un certain domaine médical et vielli.


0

Think of Nous sommes lundi. as We are monday. (which in fact is the word for word translation as you already know) as in We are on a monday day and on this day we do laundry. Both Aujourd'hui c'est lundi. / C'est lundi. and On est lundi. are correct as well. And the last one is indeed less formal as it uses on instead of nous


11

Nous sommes lundi is a slightly formal/written way to tell which day of the week it is. One can also say Nous sommes [le] lundi premier septembre. This French idiom can only be used in the first person plural. You can't say Je suis lundi or ils sont lundi because the current weekday is expected to be the same for everyone. The same idiom exists in Spanish: ...


1

I would say "Aujourd'hui c'est lundi. / C'est lundi." and "On est lundi." are the two best way of saying it. "Aujourd'hui c'est lundi. / C'est lundi." is the most formal way and "On est lundi." is a bit less formal, but still very appropriate. I personally never used "Nous sommes lundi." and don't recall ever hearing or even reading it.


1

Le faux-ami : biquotidien bien que de construction semblable veut dire le contraire, soit deux fois par jour. Si les professions médicales utilisent un jour sur deux c'est qu'il ne doit pas y avoir de mot, aucune racine latine ou grecque pour exprimer ce rythme qui ne correspond pas à un cycle naturel ou à un cycle rattaché à la lune (comme les semaines ...


3

J'ai la course à faire does not sound like proper french. J'ai une course à faire can indeed be used to say go shopping but has a more broader meaning. For example, it's ok to use it when you go to the postoffice, to the hairdresser, if you have to go pickup something,... It's also quite a generic expression that can be used as an excuse to leave if you do ...



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