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19

ca is not a word in French. It can only be used as an abbreviation: - of the centiare - of circa and these two abbreviations are rarely used. Only ça exists as a word in French. What you might have encountered is "Ca", with a capital 'C'. When typing some people omit the cedilla on capital 'C', but it is considered as a mistake. This post about accents on ...


13

Variété is short for Musique de variétés and is a common word (albeit not often used by young people) to refer to popular music. Wiktionnaire has that definition.


11

Soudain peut être soit adjectif soit adverbe : Un phénomène soudain ... Soudain, il se leva ... D'autres emplois (quasiment inusités aujourd'hui) existent: tout soudain (aussitôt) attesté en 1541 : Et, tout soudain, une clameur sauvage: « iaha! » le signal! le signal! la chasse est ouverte! en soudain (promptement, aussitôt) soudain que ...


11

EDIT: You should first understand the answer of guillaume girod-vitouchkina: soudain can be either an adjective or an adverb while soudainement is always an adverb. The following assumes that the question only makes sense if soudain and soudainement are used as adverbs. At first, I would have said, following Larousse, that soudain and soudainement are ...


6

"To look" + adjective in French can be said a couple different ways. "Avoir l'air______", e.g. "J'ai l'air ridicule." "Paraître______" e.g. "Elle paraît fatiguée." "Sembler______" e.g. "Ça semble intéressant !" "pretty" can be said a few different ways as well, depending on the context. "Plutôt" "Assez" are the most commonly used. ...


6

You probably can keep catgirl but if you want a French word, I can suggest minette which means both a female cat and a young/pretty girl.


5

A meaningfull sentence could be "suite de l'épreuve de mathématiques (...)", which would mean "next part of the math test". Here "suite de" have the meaning of "next part of".


5

It could means three things. The first two, which are both plausible without more context, are the vulgar way to refer to penetration, and the slang way to say “to dupe” (with a lot of nuances, and is up to interpretation). It could also mean kissing (it was used for kissing on the hand), but nowadays one would more likely say “Je lui ai fait un baiser”, or ...


5

When people do not have French keyboards available, they sometimes write ça as ca. This is becoming much less common as more and more systems are adapted to work with the French alphabet. The standard spelling is ça. As a learner you should always use ça unless you really have no way to type it.


5

For me: Top left: des clous Middle left: une hache, une masse and un marteau Bottom left: une scie à bois and une scie à métaux Top center: I don't recognize it... Maybe une caisse à outils? Top right: du bois (?) Middle right: un mètre Bottom right: un rabot. This is very specific and the picture is not very clear.


5

The right and established expression is indeed Station balnéaire. No native speaker would say une station de mer but you'll probably be understood as it is grammatically correct. A quick google search shows this expression appears sporadically and is perfectly understandable in a suitable context. e.g.: ...


4

Arrêtez S.V.P. de m'envoyer des e-mails est correct. La phrase la plus administrativement élaborée serait de dire : Je vous prie de bien vouloir ne plus m'importuner avec vos courriels. En revanche : Par avance, merci de supprimer mon adresse de vos listes d'envoi peut être très efficace, car ni agressive, ni familière la phrase correspond ...


4

Using "Je l'ai baisée", people will think about these meanings, in this order: You fucked her You tricked her You kissed her The two first possibilities will be eleminated only if the context makes it very clear it is not this meaning, like if it is a text written a long time ago or if you are speaking in a old-fashioned polished register of language, or ...


4

Here, "aux amarres rompues" means that the canons used to be moored to their places and that, probably following a storm, the moorings went torn, so the canons began rolling on the floor. "labourer" is an image to express the fact that the wheels of the canons rolling on the floor of the ship were so heavy that they were digging a sort of grove on the ...


4

"Fine bouche" means "thin mouth" (the prononciation is close in french and in english, by the way). It was originally "petite bouche" ("small mouth"). If you're a gourmet, you're more likely to eat your food little by little, not opening your mouth too wide and less likely to swallow big chunk without masticating. Thus the expression. Like Papa Poule said ...


4

"Soudainement" is an adverb. "Soudain" can be either an adverb or an adjective. When you need an adjective, you have to use "soudain", whereas it is an epithete or an attribute: Un fracas soudain me sortit de ma torpeur. Je ne sais pas quoi répondre, tout cela est si soudain ! When you need to qualify a verb, you have to use "soudainement": ...


3

Most of the time, everyone will think of the dirty word, unless it's in well-known expressions, like "baiser la main" or the noun "un tendre baiser" or if it is used in texts using elevated language throughout.


3

Bâtisse is a usually slightly derogatory way to name any unremarkable building. The building doesn't necessarily need to be old to deserve being qualified a bâtisse. Bâtiment is more common and is not derogatory. It apply more to a large building than a small one, has a wider spectrum of meanings (a submarine, carry-over and cruise ship are bâtiments but ...


3

To add to Fatalize's answer I would say that 'variété' has come to designate older music by French artists, such as the music of Claude François or Alain Souchon. A similar term is "la chanson française".


3

Bâtisse est une altération de l'ancien français bastissement basé sur le participe présent de bâtir, alors que le bâtiment provient de bastiment par l'ancien provençal. C'est surtout par métonymie que les sens se sont développés, les sens originaux concernant l'action de bâtir étant aujourd'hui vieillis ou éteints. Larousse les présente généralement comme ...


3

"Une station de mer" n'existe pas. On dit en effet "une station balnéaire".


2

Je ne veux pas qu'ils à mourir is incorrect / ungrammatical. Je ne veux pas qu'ils meurent is fine and likely the best translation you can use.


2

The second one is correct. In French, you don't use à before infinitives to indicate the "to", it's implied.


2

Any of the following verbs might suit, depending on the language level or the amount of angryness you want arrêter cesser stopper (anglicism though) mettre un terme mettre fin à


2

«D'être mal compris» Is "to be misunderstood". Voir le verbe comprendre II.2.a


2

Yes, a "canon aux amarres rompues" would be a canon that has torn free of its moorings/ties. However, in this sentence it is not the canons that are "crasse"-like. I'll translate "crasse" as "filth" as it seems more accurate to me, but maybe someone has a more accurate translation. In this situation "comme" doesn't mean "like" be "... as ..." for a ...


2

There is no specific rule defining the use of "tout" instead of "très". It is mostly an oral use adding an undertone. For example, "un très petit bébé" in a french's mouth means that an usually small baby. "un tout petit bébé" means a cute baby. Sometimes the undertone is friendship, cuteness, humour ... If you use "très" to mean "very" in some cases, your ...


2

I would say it is possible to use it with almost any adjective (tout petit, tout beau, etc...) but in my mind using it implies some sort of affection, and denotes a sense of endearment towards the thing being described. A bit like using 'wee' in English: un tout petit bébé -> a wee baby I do not think there is an actual rule for it.


2

Two fairly extensive lists, which I found by googling for "french idioms": http://french.about.com/library/express/blexdico-a.htm http://www.languagerealm.com/french/frenchidioms.php


2

In my experience, only saying "climatisé(e)" is just fine if the context is understood. When you use "C'est," your subject becomes neutral. So even though you're referring to the 'cantine,' you would say: C'est nouveau et climatisé. But you could also say, after already referring to the 'cantine' : Elle est nouvelle et climatisée.



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