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28

This is one of the most subtle and complicated points in the French language. In fact, I think you could say that it has more to do with the culture than with the language itself. It's not really something that can be easily taught on this site. Until you have a good feel for it, you can use the following rules of thumb: If you are young (say, 24 and ...


16

Yes, the conjugation between the formal and plural you (vous) is always exactly the same. Now, slightly related to your question, the plural of adjectives is different. For example: to a single woman: Vous êtes belle. to several women: Vous êtes belles.


14

There is a fascinating article on Wikipedia about this question. It suggests that starting in the fourth century Roman emperors were addressed using the plural "vos", as plurality is a symbol of power. This usage apparently spread, so that now all Romance languages have a distinction between second person singular forms to express formality/familiarity.


12

Apparemment, d'après cet article que je cite, Le pluriel de majesté apparut sous le règne de Dioclétien, en l'an 285, lorsqu'il devint nécessaire d'instaurer une direction collégiale à la tête de l'Empire romain (le Bas-Empire, ainsi que l'appellent les historiens), celui-ci s'étendant alors de l'Écosse à l'Égypte : ce fut la "tétrarchie", associant ...


11

The agreement for adjectives is dependant on the real number: to a single person: Vous êtes sympathique. to several persons: Vous êtes sympathiques. As an aside, verb inflexions are the same in both cases (plural vous, or singular formal vous).


11

Vous is used when you are talking to a person in a formal situation (like your superior), or to a stranger. Tu is used when talking to somebody you know well enough. It is often considered okay to say tu when persons address each other using their given name. (To address several persons vous is always used.)


10

In France Vous use cases You use vous: by default, when you don't know the person and the person is older, by default, when you don't know the person and the person has the same age and you are over 30 years old, as a mark of respect to someone (for example a father/mother in law), when you want to sound old-fashionly romantic (saying vous to a woman ...


8

C'est en très grande partie issu du contexte. Les traducteurs ont tendance à regarder par exemple les époques et les rôles sociaux des personnages. S'il y a par exemple une relation de maître à élève, d'homme d'affaire à un autre, etc… les « you » se traduiront majoritairement par « vous ». Après, dans un contexte familial, les autres mots utilisés aideront ...


7

Au Québec, peu de gens seront vexés de se faire tutoyer. Le vouvoiement est plutôt utilisé dans un contexte très très formel comme une entrevue, lorsqu'on rencontre un supérieur pour la première fois, dans une communication avec un client, etc. Même dans un contexte académique, on tutoie assez rapidement un professeur. Si tu as besoin d'information d'un ...


5

Answer about French language: not only this particular use of tu and vous is not standard, it just is not relevant. For the usage of tu and vous, see, for instance, this site or wikipedia. The app could use tu or vous, question of choice on what they want to convey, but definitely the same form in both, correct and incorrect cases. In educational contexts, ...


4

Vincent gives the main things to know. On the other hand, I am a native and I don't like to be patronized, so since I am 20 I apply a strict reciprocity rule : if you use "tu" with me I will do the same (same for "vous"). Of course, if I use "tu" with someone, I won't be offended that he do the same with me ;)


4

Should you be talking to one person, the verb agrees with vous as if it was a singular subject. This because this is actually a singular subject, despite the polite use of a plural person. So the correct sentence is, in this case: Vous êtes sympathique !


4

Personnellement, je crois que le contexte d'une auberge de jeunesse, ou probablement une personne d'un âge relativement jeune, avec un contexte social assez amical justifierait ton expérience. Je crois qu'à un certain âge (20-30 ans) il y a plusieurs Québécois qui utilisent un tutoiement poli. Sans être nécessairement lié à votre expérience, je crois que ...


4

Marcel Cohen signale dans son Histoire d'une langue : le français que c'est à l'époque féodale que qu'en France on a commencé à employer vous au lieu de tu par respect pour une personne mais que l'emploi n'est pas régulier dans les textes. J'ai trouvé des exemples précis dans : Wolff Philippe. Premières recherches sur l'apparition du vouvoiement en latin ...


4

It is called "vouvoiement". There is three different ways to talk to someone: Tu, singular, second person Target: You are speaking to only one person. Context: You know this person. It is a friend, a member of your family or in some cases a colleague you work with (some people are not comfortable with it though). This isn't formal, but it is still ...


3

Short answer: It depends on who you are talking to. Long answer: If you respect the person, then vous is appropriate. If the person is a stranger, then use vous. Otherwise, it is perfectly fine to use tu. In addition, using tu is not an insult; vous is just more formal and slightly more polite. Using tu is certainly not the same as "cussing someone out" in ...


3

No. The adjectives in this case follow notional or semantic, not purely grammatical agreement. The verb goes in the plural, but the adjectives go in the singular.


3

Roughly, use tu when you would be comfortable calling someone by their given name. Note that the French are more touchy about it than Quebecers (in the workplace, it's expected you'll use vous a lot more in France, whereas in Quebec you'll frequently be called tu by salespeople or waiters).


3

J'accorde logiquement. Donc au singulier pour un vous de politesse ou un nous de modestie, au pluriel pour un on utilisé comme première personne du pluriel, au féminin pour un on ironique utilisé comme deuxième personne du singulier en m'adressant à une femme — On a du remord et on est venue demander pardon ? (en fait comme on peut avoir toutes les valeurs, ...


2

En plus de ce que @Joubarc mentionne concernant le fait que le « tu » soit souvent utilisé pour substituer le « on », j'ajouterai l'élément suivant : Le niveau d'implication, ou l'émotion, de la personne s'exprimant peut pousser l'interlocuteur à tutoyer plutôt qu'à vouvoyer. Je pense que cela vient d'un sentiment de proximité avec l'autre personne. Dans le ...


2

Tu used inappropriately can be interpreted as a lack of respect by certain people. It would be the equivalent of being overly friendly with a senior manager you haven't met yet. The person would probably not be insulted per se but will probably think that you do not respect their status. If the context is you being a tourist it would not be weird if you ...


2

Unless you are yourself a kid or talking to a kid, just use vous. Nobody will ever be outraged if you do it, being too polite is never insulting. Wait for the person you are talking with to suggest using tu ( « on peut se tutoyer » ) and don't take that initiative before being well aware with the level of familiarity required. Even if you are aware, don't ...


2

If a French person started choosing between tu and vous randomly, then it's clear that using tu inappropriately would cause problems more often than an inappropriate vous would, and is certainly more dangerous. However, it's important to understand that using vous instead of tu can also be a problem in certain situations where less formality is expected. It ...


1

There are situations were using tu instead of vous (and even using vous instead of tu) is perceived to be insulting (a native speaker may very well intend to be insulting by doing so). For a visibly non native speaker, I'd fear a faux-pas less with higher up (who tend to be well traveled enough to understand the matter and are in position to give you the ...


1

Gramatically, vous is second person plural and you should aways conjugate in plural, but it's common in many languages to use the plural as a way of expressing respect or politeness towards a single person. Even in the english phrase "And you? What do you do?" you can be plural, but as it happens, it's the same word for plural and singular in English.


1

I use "tu" everytime, mostly because I don't know the "vous" version of the word. E.g. tiens or tenez. It's pretty obvious that I'm a foreigner, even with putting on a decent Bergeracois accent. My skin tone must give it away. I've never come across anybody taking "tu" in a disrespectful way, they'd be more disappointed with just speaking English at them. ...


1

My advise would be that, when you don't know what to use, except for children (where tu is probably your best choice), would be to use vous by default as it is more respectful. Then, at the beginning or later, if you want to be more friendly (so that's not with everyone, generally not with your boss for instance), you can ask "Est-ce que je peux te/vous ...


1

You must use Vous when talking to several persons. Using Vous when talking to only one person marks the respect, including the simple and polite respect. You can use Tu in relaxed mode, that is : When you talk to a young person (when they not seems adult yet, lets say about 18 to 24). Note that you have to use Vous for hight titled young person, like a ...


1

I tend to always hear "tu" in québec. And "vous" is used usually speaking formally to your boss.


1

La réponse (plus ou moins évidente) est qu'il s'agit du contexte (immédiat et culturel)... Mais au risque de bousculer un consensus un peu bancal sur l'aspect "unique" (donc intraduisible) du vouvoiement français par rapport à l'anglais, je préciserais que: Même s'il n'existe pas(/plus) de différentiation au niveau des pronoms, il reste une nuance ...



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