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819
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location New York, New York
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Nov 10 at 16:50

Aug
23
asked How to call similar words in two languages with different meanings?
Aug
23
comment What are the informal uses of “voilà”?
@Raphink: That may be the way it looks to a native speaker. But I'm a foreigner, see "voilà" quite a lot, and "sort of" know the answer, but that's not the same as actually knowing. And part of the question is, "are there any other common meanings that I may have missed. The references to "depuis" and "il y a" in an answer below were enlightening, at least to me.
Aug
22
asked What are the informal uses of “voilà”?
Aug
22
accepted When would one use “à” before a verb?
Aug
22
comment When would one use “à” before a verb?
@Raphink: I edited the question for greater clarity. I believe such an edit allows you to remove the downvote. And an upvote to you (and the others) for your answer.
Aug
22
revised When would one use “à” before a verb?
added 74 characters in body
Aug
22
comment When would one use “à” before a verb?
There's an element of truth to what you say. But the question is about "English" as it affects my UNDERSTANDING of French. Apparently "to" is used differently in English than in French, which is why I was confused.
Aug
22
asked When would one use “à” before a verb?
Aug
21
awarded  Commentator
Aug
21
comment Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
@Gilles: Have I convinced you that I wanted a deeper answer than could be found in the links, and will you withdraw your downvote?
Aug
21
revised Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
added 11 characters in body
Aug
21
comment Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
In a discussion with a literary group over the weekend, someone pointed out that similar "early" instruments such as sundials, were used to measure both time and temperature. So apparently, there was a "common cause," but not an obvious one. And it seems that other languages, such as Japanese also have overlaps between the words for time and temperature. But this is a non-obvious, non-trivial relationship that I wouldn't have guessed. I honestly thought that they had different origins.
Aug
19
comment Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
@Gilles: Good point. Most of the references of temps are to "time." Some refer to "nature," i.e. a year, or seasons, but not specifically to "weather," which is the other meaning. Maybe "seasons" is operative reference, but that's not clear. The common denominator I can think of is "speed." That is "speed" of activity (time), and speed of molecules (temperature) and other weather causes. But I don't get this idea from my readings.
Aug
19
awarded  Editor
Aug
19
revised Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
edited title
Aug
19
comment Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
OK, I'd use something like "tempo" for time in English. Then the question is, does "tempo" have a common origin with "temperature" (or weather).
Aug
19
asked Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
Aug
19
accepted Who, exactly, were the “sans culottes”?
Aug
18
comment Is there a “non-religious” definition of “catholique”?
Except that they were "L'Homme, et La Musique," Therefore, "abnormal" is fine in this context, "unchaste" (or impudique) is not.
Aug
18
comment Who, exactly, were the “sans culottes”?
So it was a reference to dress, rather than wealth. That was the kind of answer I was looking for.