1,283 reputation
619
bio website
location New York, New York
age 57
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Jul 16 at 22:14

Jul
8
comment What's the correct gender for pets?
"In general, the female name for cat is also used (slang) for female genitals." Yes, even in English, to go "catting" is to go dating.
Jun
25
comment What does “bien” in “ou bien” mean?
Could "bien" mean "else" in this context?
Jun
20
comment Why “de + infinitive” instead of “à + -ant" in “finissez de mourir”?
The construction seems to be, "finish of dying," where "de" is a so-called "adverb of quantity."
Jun
27
comment What is the correct French noun for a school report?
Which kind of "report" do you mean? Do you mean a report ON the student's progress, like a report card? Or do you mean a report BY the student as a work project?
Jun
1
comment Que veut dire l'expression « bon vivant » ?
Selon la response de M'vy, "Bon vivant" désigne une personne qui aime les bonnes choses de la vie, notamment la nourriture et les boissons raffinées (les plaisirs de la table)." "Un "homme de la ville" va à des restaurants coûteux," est d'accord avec cette reponse. Ma continuation, "et couche avec des jolies femmes. L'équivalent anglo-américain pourrait être high roller," est COMPLEMENTAIRE avec cette reponse.
Mar
20
comment What exactly does “savoir faire” refer to?
@a3nm: That's what I want to find out.
Feb
23
comment What exactly does “savoir faire” refer to?
"Savvy" can be a noun, verb or adjective in (American) English. It's a bit confusing.
Feb
23
comment Differences in meaning depending on placement of “pauvre?”
@My question was not, "can you put this adjective before or after the noun?" but "what are the differences in MEANING when you do so?" Apparently there were several "similar" questions in this regard. But they all use DIFFERENT adjectives with different meanings. Unless there is a "master list" (on this site) of such adjectives, including "pauvre," I do not consider this question a duplicate, and ask that my question be re-opened.
Nov
4
comment Why the pronounciation of “Monsieur?”
Welcome to the site. An upvote to get you going.
Nov
4
comment Why the pronounciation of “Monsieur?”
@LeVieuxGildas: I said that Monsieur was pronounced MORE LIKE [emphasis added] "Miss-sieur" (to my ear). That does not rule out your more correct transliteration, "Meussieu."
Oct
8
comment Why do some french people inappropriately add an 'h' before English words starting with 'a' or 'e'?
@Gilles: As edited, the question is clear enough. Now the issue is, "is it on topic?"
May
4
comment Why “de + infinitive” instead of “à + -ant" in “finissez de mourir”?
Gilles: Thank you for the correction, and your answer below. As for the headline, in my version, it was all "capitals." But this is a French translation of a novel talking about a "sensational" headline in either English or French.
Apr
28
comment Use of “Vie sociale”
I would translate "Il n'a pas de vie" (idiomatically) as, "He needs to get a life." But the translation "does the job."
Sep
7
comment About “unusual” word order?
@Axiophase: You're right if it's noun verb noun. But I was using a construction of noun pronoun verb.
Sep
6
comment About “unusual” word order?
@Evpok: I've studied Russian, German, and Latin, all of which use grammatical cases.
Sep
6
comment About “unusual” word order?
In this particular construction, yes. A more usual construction, might be "Tu m'aimes," in which case it is accusative.
Sep
6
comment About “unusual” word order?
OK, I meant the usual subject, verb, object, wecept when referring to personal pronouns, which would then be subject object verb. But manquer uses a "different" construction.
Sep
1
comment Differences between “Oui” and “Si” in the affirmative?
@Dave: I have shortened the Japanese reference, and altered the Spanish reference.
Aug
24
comment Traduire « the other side of the coin »?
@Joubarc: Not "usually," no. But occasionally it's the correct one. I was a bit surprised that this answer was so close.
Aug
24
comment Traduire « the other side of the coin »?
Close to, but not exactly the "literal" translation. Thanks.