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location New York, New York
age 57
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Jul 24 at 18:34

Aug
23
comment How to call similar words in two languages with different meanings?
So noted, and corrected. Thanks.
Aug
23
comment How to call similar words in two languages with different meanings?
@zejam: I edited the question to ask for the FRENCH term, But your point is well taken.
Aug
23
comment What are the informal uses of “voilà”?
@Raphink: That may be the way it looks to a native speaker. But I'm a foreigner, see "voilà" quite a lot, and "sort of" know the answer, but that's not the same as actually knowing. And part of the question is, "are there any other common meanings that I may have missed. The references to "depuis" and "il y a" in an answer below were enlightening, at least to me.
Aug
22
comment When would one use “à” before a verb?
@Raphink: I edited the question for greater clarity. I believe such an edit allows you to remove the downvote. And an upvote to you (and the others) for your answer.
Aug
22
comment When would one use “à” before a verb?
There's an element of truth to what you say. But the question is about "English" as it affects my UNDERSTANDING of French. Apparently "to" is used differently in English than in French, which is why I was confused.
Aug
21
comment Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
@Gilles: Have I convinced you that I wanted a deeper answer than could be found in the links, and will you withdraw your downvote?
Aug
21
comment Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
In a discussion with a literary group over the weekend, someone pointed out that similar "early" instruments such as sundials, were used to measure both time and temperature. So apparently, there was a "common cause," but not an obvious one. And it seems that other languages, such as Japanese also have overlaps between the words for time and temperature. But this is a non-obvious, non-trivial relationship that I wouldn't have guessed. I honestly thought that they had different origins.
Aug
19
comment Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
@Gilles: Good point. Most of the references of temps are to "time." Some refer to "nature," i.e. a year, or seasons, but not specifically to "weather," which is the other meaning. Maybe "seasons" is operative reference, but that's not clear. The common denominator I can think of is "speed." That is "speed" of activity (time), and speed of molecules (temperature) and other weather causes. But I don't get this idea from my readings.
Aug
19
comment Etymology of the different uses of “temps?” / L'étymologie des homonymes de “temps”
OK, I'd use something like "tempo" for time in English. Then the question is, does "tempo" have a common origin with "temperature" (or weather).
Aug
18
comment Is there a “non-religious” definition of “catholique”?
Except that they were "L'Homme, et La Musique," Therefore, "abnormal" is fine in this context, "unchaste" (or impudique) is not.
Aug
18
comment Who, exactly, were the “sans culottes”?
So it was a reference to dress, rather than wealth. That was the kind of answer I was looking for.
Aug
18
comment Who, exactly, were the “sans culottes”?
I did read this (or rather, the English version, which is shorer), and got something out of it, like the part of the legging, but wanted more context and color.
Aug
18
comment What was the special name for “French Protestant?”
That's the name. "Nowadays would only be used in a historical context" explains why it's not easy to remember.
Aug
18
comment Is there a “non-religious” definition of “catholique”?
OK, so it means, "We're not the USUAL kind of lovers." That makes sense in this context. Another word I might use in this context is "orthodox."