395 reputation
17
bio website raisonsociale.net
location Montreal, Canada
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jan 21 at 16:57

I am an accounting systems analyst for a Canadian bank. I have studied accounting and business administration in Montreal and my experience in programming includes a little bit of many languages / technologies (PHP, C++, C#, VBA).

I work daily with VBA and many different versions of the Office suite (2000 to 2007) though I am still very much learning VBA.


Jan
21
comment What would be the 'You and I' equivalent in French?
That's why Larousse precised with "S'emploie souvent" instead of just saying "on" can replace "nous" in a grammatically correct sentence. You will hear it all the time however but that does not make it correct French.
Jan
19
comment What would be the 'You and I' equivalent in French?
In this case, it is nous that would be stressed. It implies that you are comparing "you and I" to somebody else instead of just stating a fact. It's thus ok to use "toi et moi" because it is more precise than "nous" while not adding an unnecessary stress.
Jan
19
comment What would be the 'You and I' equivalent in French?
I disagree that "Toi et moi avons" is awkward. It's more formal, yes. Also, I don't think "Toi et moi, nous avons" is formal. I would personnaly consider it is between familiar and formal. Orally, the first example is indeed what I hear most often.
Jan
19
comment What would be the 'You and I' equivalent in French?
Actually you have to consider "Toi et moi" as a nominal group and thus they are together a noun of the 1st person plural form. The addition of "nous" after "Toi et moi" can be used for emphasis when speaking (as your quote said "Pour insister à l'oral") but it sounds odd in written form (at least to me as a native french speaker). As your next quotes show, it is "stressed form" and thus does not constitute normal usage in a sentence. It has a certain strength that is not well suited for all conversation. Until you can fully grasp that nuance it's best to not add another pronoun ("nous").
Jan
18
comment What would be the 'You and I' equivalent in French?
Note that "Toi et moi, nous avons" is incorrect as well. It should be "Toi et moi avons". "nous" is superfluous.
Dec
2
comment How do I designate the person I live with but I'm not married to ?
Femme / homme ? "Ma femme" est clairement un terme réservé aux gens mariés. "Mon homme" n'est pas un équivalent de "Mari" et bien que je l'ai entendu, il s'agit plutôt d'une référence général à un conjoint plutôt qu'à un statut de non marié.
Nov
10
comment How to translate “hot dog” in France French?
@PapaPoule J'ai rarement entendu "vapeur" utilisé pour un hotdog vapeur, mais "steamé" oui (emprunt et francisation de "steamed hotdogs"). Similairement, à Montréal on peut entendre parler de "steamies" qui fait un peu plus anglo. Aussi oui, ça réfère seulement aux hot-dogs cuits à la vapeur.
Nov
7
comment Junk foods en français!
Ça me semble un régionalisme québécois. Est-ce aussi utilisé en France et ailleurs ?
Oct
13
comment How to translate “hot dog” in France French?
Never heard anybody in Quebec ever say "Chien-chaud" seriously. Edit: I've lived North shore and South Shore of Montreal as well as Montreal itself. I know people from Quebec, Saguenay and Abitibi and all of them would find it very odd in a conversation to use "chien chaud".
Oct
10
comment Différence entre « en haut / en bas » et « au-dessus / au-dessous »
Je ne sais pas s'il s'agit d'une différence régionale, mais il me semble que les deux sont interchangeables, au Québec.
Sep
29
comment When to use or omit definite/indefinite articles after “après”?
I'm going to put this as a comment because I don't know for sure. As a native french speaker, both sound fine written as well as orally but I have a feeling that "Après dîner" is not grammatically correct.
Sep
29
answered Que veut dire « J'ai pris mes larmes à mon cou » ici ?
Sep
29
answered How grave of a mistake is it to misuse 'tu' and 'vous'?
Sep
26
comment Traduction de « making out »
Encore une fois, ce sont toutes des expressions seulement utilisables en France à l'exception de "becotter" qui a la même signification.
Sep
26
comment Traduction de « making out »
Attention ! Au Québec, "se pelotter" est une façon excessivement vulgaire de dire "avoir une relation sexuelle". Mieux vaut éviter.
Sep
22
comment French translation for “let's cross that bridge when we come to it”? — Comment traduire « let's cross that bridge when we come to it » ?
@boisvert C'est toujours mieux que parking, shopping, fioule et compagnie. Aussi, c'est la seule réponse valable selon moi. "Ne tire pas de plans sur la comète" is the most upvoted answer. Seriously ?
Sep
17
comment Can you “somehow” translate this?
Those do not have the same meaning as "somehow".
Sep
15
answered Quand est-ce qu'on écrit “er” ou “é” à la fin
Sep
6
comment “Pelle de neige” vs “pelle à neige”
Actually, "pelle de neige" would be a shovel made of snow. I've never heard it used instead of "pelletée de neige".
Sep
2
comment What does “Qu'est-ce que c'est bon!” mean?
Je n'ai pas donné -1, mais je crois que c'est parce que la réponse ne souligne pas le fait que cette formulation n'est pas grammaticalement correcte pour une exclamation. On devrait dire "Qu'elle est belle !", par exemple.