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Feb
16
awarded  Teacher
Feb
16
answered Related French and English words — how to find them ?
Nov
26
awarded  Scholar
Nov
26
accepted Agreement of the past participle in presence of a reflexive pronoun
Nov
22
awarded  Student
Nov
22
awarded  Editor
Nov
22
comment Agreement of the past participle in presence of a reflexive pronoun
I corrected, I meant "Les reines se sont succédé". My mistake.
Nov
22
revised Agreement of the past participle in presence of a reflexive pronoun
deleted 1 characters in body
Nov
22
comment Agreement of the past participle in presence of a reflexive pronoun
"Les rois se sont succédé" was a part of a "Dictée de Pivot" as far as I can remember. Maybe this link gives information, but I don't understand what's being said on it... fr.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Discussion:succédées
Nov
22
asked Agreement of the past participle in presence of a reflexive pronoun
Nov
22
comment Pourquoi « comment vous appelez-vous », et pas « quel est votre nom » comme en anglais ?
Well I think my answer leads to an obvious answer : Germanic languages, such as German, former English (with hoten, see my message), Dutch, Norwegian, Swedish,etc, use the same syntax, which is "How are you called". Latin languages, or at least Italian, Spanish, French and Portuguese use "How do you call yourself". The link is actually quite obvious, isn't it ? Actually, despite what the OP said about this way of asking being "special" for French (which is not, it's the same for all latin languages I quoted above), if you look closer, English is the special case here.
Nov
21
awarded  Supporter
Nov
21
answered Pourquoi « comment vous appelez-vous », et pas « quel est votre nom » comme en anglais ?