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1d
revised Expressing “There's no such thing as …” emphatically
subjonctif pour un hypothétique, comme suggéré par jilliagre
1d
comment Expressing “There's no such thing as …” emphatically
@Yay With both sentence constructions, both the subjunctive (puisse) and the indicative (peut) can be used. On reflection, here, I think the subjunctive is more neutral, and more appropriate. The indicative implies that the speaker considers that clothes can be strange, and thus that Londoners are blind to an existing concept. In informal speech, the indicative wouldn't have this implication, it would just be a substitution for the subjunctive, but this sentence isn't informal enough for that.
2d
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
28
comment Pronunciation of “vingt”
@Aerovistae A combination of having asked various French people and looking up in … I don't remember, I didn't add any reference to the post so I must have made a wide compilation without drawing more than single data points from any single source.
Apr
28
comment Pourquoi n'y a-t-il pas de contraire de “cher” ?
@Aerovistae Não, por quê?
Apr
26
answered Expressing “There's no such thing as …” emphatically
Apr
26
comment Pronunciation of “vingt”
@Nasso C'est vraiment [vɛ̃.dø] et pas [vɛ̃d.dø] ? Effectivement le t se voise, mais je n'ai pas l'habitude d'entendre 22 prononcé avec une seule consonne entre les deux voyelles.
Apr
26
comment Expressing “There's no such thing as …” emphatically
Non, c'est un contresens. Cette phrase signifie que les Londoniens n'ont tellement pas l'habitude des vêtements bizarres qu'ils ne peuvent pas imaginer que des vêtements que le lecteur considère comme bizarre existe. Alors qu'on cherche à exprimer l'idée contraire : ils ont tellement l'habitude des vêtements que nous considérons comme bizarres qu'ils n'ont pas le concept de bizarrerie pour les vêtements.
Apr
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
23
revised How to give a clothes measurement in French?
edited tags; edited tags
Apr
21
comment What is the difference in usage and nuance between content and heureux?
@Aerovistae Nobody says “ils vécurent heureux pour toujours”. books.google.com/ngrams/…
Apr
21
comment What is the difference in usage and nuance between content and heureux?
@Aerovistae It's an idiom, so it would be kept in the passé simple (and similarly the reference to having many children would be kept without implying that the people involved did in fact have many children).
Apr
19
comment Is 'ouïr' used at all anymore?
@Aerovistae “J'étais” in 17th/18th century spelling.
Apr
18
comment Correct use of indefinite articles with plural objects and singular subjects
Both are correct, they mean different things (see the duplicate question). @Lambie This isn't about “la vie d'abeille” but “la vie d'abeilles” vs “la vie des abeilles”.
Apr
18
revised Correct use of indefinite articles with plural objects and singular subjects
added 2 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Apr
18
comment Accord du verbe quand sujet ambigu
Cette réponse est fausse. On peut tout à fait dire que le groupe se sépare. Les phrases proposées sont correctes, mais « Le Vautour s'est séparé » est aussi correct.
Apr
18
comment Accord du verbe quand sujet ambigu
@AnneAunyme Hmm, « Le groupe La Chouette s'est séparé », « La Chouette s'est … » J'ai tendance à écrire « séparée » mais je pense que les deux sont possibles. Et si le nom du groupe était au pluriel j'aurais tendance à mettre le verbe au pluriel.
Apr
18
answered Accord du verbe quand sujet ambigu
Apr
11
comment Verb suffixes in French
@Aerovistae No, three, as explained in the last paragraph of Eau's answer. But the last group is “everything else”, and it contains verbs with different etymological derivations.
Apr
11
comment Is “variété” used to refer to music?
This answer would be better if it was more informative about language and less of a diatribe about certain kinds of noises made for pleasure and entertainment.