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May
3
comment Meaning of “les ayant portés”
Do you have trouble understanding the French expression (in which case we can help), or are you looking for the right English word (in which case we can't help)? On a personal note, I think people would understand in context, but English wouldn't use carried here but borne.
May
3
comment Meaning of “les ayant portés”
An obvious mistake is that Israéliens in English is Israelis, not Israelites.
May
3
comment Meaning of “les ayant portés”
This site is about French, not about English. Furthermore this isn't a question, it's a review request, which is not what Stack Exchange is about.
May
2
comment How to translate “people-watching”, the verb “to people-watch”?
In modern French, voyeur has a sexual connotation by default. It is not an appropriate translation for “people-watching”.
May
1
comment How to express “this is all about” in French?
@StéphaneGimenez I'd use those sentences in everyday conversation. Maybe overusing “fondamentalement” is a scientist deformation?
May
1
comment How to express “this is all about” in French?
No, this is not a correct translation. I think you interpreted the English expression literally, but it's an idiom. “X is all about Y” is not synonymous with “X is exclusively about Y”, it means that Y is the main topic or the main purpose of X. Iside's answer is a lot closer to the correct meaning.
Apr
27
comment Prononciation de « u » proche de « ou »
C'est difficile de juger avec un son isolé, mais je trouve french.about.com/library/media/wavs/u.wav atypique, intermédiaire entre [y] et [i].
Apr
24
comment Start learning French through English
Welcome to Stack Exchange. This is a questions and answers site, not a link collection. I'm afraid that questions asking for list of resources do very poorly in our system: they tend to accumulate random lists of vaguely-related dubiously-applicable links, and this one is shaping up to be no exception. See also meta.french.stackexchange.com/q/127 and meta.french.stackexchange.com/q/575 on our meta site.
Apr
19
comment How to say “something sucks” in French
I can't claim that this doesn't work in French, because it might work in some variant. But in French from France, this sounds weird and doesn't mean anything close to “cold-calling sucks”: “Dur dur” means that something is difficult, and “phoning” isn't a word.
Apr
12
comment Meaning of “imaginer des coiffures”
What makes you think that the literal translation “the barber/hairdresser imagines hairstyles” is not the intended meaning? I don't know any idiomatic expression that it could match. Please provide the context.
Apr
11
comment Free online resources for beginner course
The accumulation of answers that just says “look at this site” and randomly get upvoted, downvoted or neither illustrates why this sort of link farm question doesn't work on Stack Exchange. I am closing this question which is officially frowned upon.
Apr
4
comment How do I say “I'll see you in an hour”?
Tiens, on ne dit pas «à dans une heure» au Québec ? En France c'est parfaitement standard.
Apr
3
comment Un nom pour parler du caractère borné d'un objet : “bornitude” ?
Non, ça ne marche pas du tout, parce qu'en mathématiques, les mots paramètre, limite et borné désignent des concepts différents.
Mar
22
comment Does “il y en a” always mean “there is / are some”? Does “il n'y en a pas” always mean “there isn't / aren't any”?
“Il y a” has never been exclusively singular. This was already incorrect in the early 1980s, and in the early 1880s too. The word “en” doesn't change the number, it's a pronoun that stands for a set or a place.
Mar
18
comment How to pronounce “et est”?
I wouldn't say that ‘"est" is the canonical "è"’. I treat [e] and [ɛ] as different sounds, but in my dialect/idiolect (France, Normandy/Paris) the word est can shift to [e] in many contexts. I might say “et elle est” [e.ɛ.lɛ] or [e.ɛ.le] (the latter perhaps not in very formal speech), even “et n'est pas” [e.nɛ.pa] or [e.ne.pa]. Nonetheless I would always pronounce “et est” [e.ɛ] to separate the two words.
Mar
18
comment How to pronounce “et est”?
Tiens, comment définirais-tu ton accent ? Est-ce que tu fais la différence entre [e] et [ɛ] dans d'autres cas ?
Mar
11
comment Comment traduire « skimmability » ?
@Amphiteóth « Lecture en diagonale » signifie explicitement qu'on ne lit pas tout. « Lecture rapide » n'a pas ce sens.
Mar
11
comment How to say “no connection” or “connection is offline” in French?
Certainement pas « connexion d'Internet », en tout cas pas en France. On dirait « connexion à Internet » ou « connexion Internet ». Et l'expression « rupture de la connexion à Internet » est très lourde. @user3772
Mar
10
comment Why isn't “tu es” written “t'es”?
@hunter Oui, en général on l'omet, mais ce n'est pas une élision : on omet un mot, pas un son.
Mar
10
comment Why isn't “tu es” written “t'es”?
@hunter No, it's “j'y irai”, and you would hear two separate [i] sounds even in casual speech. The pronoun “y” can be omitted altogether in this sentence, but that's a different sentence with the same meaning: “j'y irai”, “tu y iras”, … vs “j'irai”, “tu iras”, … What happens in this sentence is that when the destination is just a pronoun, it isn't really adding meaning and can be omitted altogether.