191 reputation
6
bio website
location United Kingdom
age 60
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Aug 5 at 16:35

The handle isn't randomly-chosen. I still type with two fingers after over 30 years as a solo custom software supplier, and I still mis-hit the keys!

Actually, I've been in (involuntary) retirement for a year or so - giving me too much time on my hands, much of which I spend on Language.se gaining rep I probably don't deserve. But I do have a keen interest in all aspects of English for my own edification, plus I get a buzz out of the way EL&U enables me to actively participate in fostering that same interest in others.

I'm more of a lurker here on "meta-meta", but things might change...


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
24
comment Are Francophones in general adopting this English swearword?
My French is a bit rusty (it was over 40 years ago when I lived in France for a year), but my ear definitely caught putain several times in the movie. And it's gratifying to see from various answers & comments here that the usage is still common. So if I go back to France and use it myself one day, I might have a terrible accent and I might sound a bit foul-mouthed, but at least I won't necessarily sound "dated, out-of-touch".
Feb
23
comment Are Francophones in general adopting this English swearword?
I'm afraid my French isn't good enough to understand the point you're making, but Google Translate confirms my suspicion that "Je dois te dire que les jumeaux baisent des salopes" means "I must tell you that the twins fuck sluts/bitches". In the context of the movie it seems more likely Jeanne wants her husband to say (something like) this to her, not that she needs to say it to him.
Feb
21
awarded  Scholar
Feb
21
accepted Are Francophones in general adopting this English swearword?
Feb
20
comment Are Francophones in general adopting this English swearword?
@Kareen, Alexandre: That certainly rings true to me. I learned the form putain [de] xxxxx when I lived in France for a year back in the 70s, and I unmistakably caught that usage several times in this movie. Another one we used a lot then which I didn't hear in this movie was vachement (for "vraiment" = very, really, extremely). For us poor students, everything was "vachement cher!".
Feb
19
comment Are Francophones in general adopting this English swearword?
Also note that Dans La Maison is only a French movie. There is no English version, "original" or otherwise - there's not even (currently) an alternative soundtrack in English. Finally, I'm not sure it's really true to say "something bad happens" - Jeanne Germain does leave her husband, but that's hardly presented as a major tragedy. There's a suicide by hanging half-way through, but that's just a surreal "dream sequence" - the "dead" kid is back on his feet a few minutes later, and sticks around for the rest of the movie.
Feb
19
awarded  Commentator
Feb
19
comment Are Francophones in general adopting this English swearword?
Just to point out - it was "accidental" that I happened to ask "Is this common in France?" in the question text. The last thing I wrote was the question title (the system forced me to do that in order to post, because I hadn't put anything in there). By then I was consciously aware that I wanted the French Canadian perspective too (and other Francophones, if they're available here). I just didn't think to double-check what I'd written earlier. Since you have answered (and called attention to my gaffe) I'll leave the text "as is", but it's not what I really meant.
Feb
19
comment Are Francophones in general adopting this English swearword?
I'll wait a while before accepting, but I'm starting to get the impression the short answer to my question is "No, this isn't going to be another "weekend" or "parking".
Feb
19
asked Are Francophones in general adopting this English swearword?
Jan
29
awarded  Supporter
Jan
29
comment Is “mettre de l'eau dans son moulin” cognate with “all grist to the mill”?
I assume you know exactly how you use the expression in French, and that it's important the person providing the grist/water doesn't realise that it will aid someone he probably doesn't want to help at all. I think there's often the same sense in English, but it's also often used in contexts where the speaker approves of what the miller can do with "unpromising material". Anyway, +1 following edit.
Jan
29
comment Is “mettre de l'eau dans son moulin” cognate with “all grist to the mill”?
@Gilles: Sorry - I thought all SO posts were supposed to be in English, which implies all posters should understand reasonably common usages (or at least, be able to google a few instances to see how it's used in context). In fact, Anglophones wouldn't normally talk about bringing grist to the mill. Mostly, we say it's all grist to the mill, meaning "that (possibly, unpromising) material can all be put to good use". Often in contexts where "good use" is in fact "bad use", from the speaker's point of view. No-one says "grist to the meal"
Jan
29
comment Is “mettre de l'eau dans son moulin” cognate with “all grist to the mill”?
It's very commendable of you to post that link! I wouldn't ask you to amend your answer if that's not how you see things, but you'll forgive me if I upvote the comment but not the answer!
Jan
29
comment Is “mettre de l'eau dans son moulin” cognate with “all grist to the mill”?
I appreciate that the "current" meaning may not be considered exactly the same. I'm primarily asking if they were originally related (i.e. - have the same basic origin). The English one wouldn't normally be used to mean "everything is a source of profit" - it's more common in contexts like "what you just said actually helps the argument you're disagreeing with", or "this person can creatively make use of things which others see as of little value"
Jan
29
comment Is “mettre de l'eau dans son moulin” cognate with “all grist to the mill”?
@Laure: I did say my french isn't that good. I'd have felt a right nit if I'd changed it and it wasn't a typo.
Jan
29
asked Is “mettre de l'eau dans son moulin” cognate with “all grist to the mill”?
Jan
5
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
28
comment “ma jolie femme” vs “ma femme jolie”
@Aya Reiko: Yes - my question here was prompted by comments on this ELU question, where tchrist said the sequence ma femme jolie effectively placed "stress" on jolie. My first interpretation of what that could possibly mean was that you have more than one, same as you.