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I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the direct object is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je le savais! but “I didn't know that” as Je ne savais pas! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Another one I often see is "J'aime," and almost never "Je l'aime," in response to being asked whether if they like something.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the direct object or not?

I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the direct object is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je le savais! but “I didn't know that” as Je ne savais pas! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the direct object or not?

I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the direct object is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je le savais! but “I didn't know that” as Je ne savais pas! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Another one I often see is "J'aime," and almost never "Je l'aime," in response to being asked whether if they like something.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the direct object or not?

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I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the direct object is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je le savais! but “I didn't know that” as Je ne savais pas! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the DOdirect object or not?

I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the direct object is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je le savais! but “I didn't know that” as Je ne savais pas! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the DO or not?

I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the direct object is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je le savais! but “I didn't know that” as Je ne savais pas! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the direct object or not?

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I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the DOdirect object is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je le savais! rather thanbut “I didn't know that” as Je lene savais! pas! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the DO or not?

I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the DO is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je savais! rather than Je le savais! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the DO or not?

I have recently begun to notice a number of places where the direct object is ommitted in translating from English to French.

For instance, I saw I'll find it translated as Je vais trouver, rather than Je vais le trouver. And I've been told to translate "I knew that!" as Je le savais! but “I didn't know that” as Je ne savais pas! There are many other examples.

I'm trying to determine whether there is any sort of intuitive rule for this, whether it completely depends on the verb, or whether it depends completely on the context.

Is there any way to predict whether I should use the DO or not?

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