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I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

  • Example 1: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

  • Example 2: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

  • Example 3a: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

  • Example 3b: Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he sayssay "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples obviously; these are just off the top of my head to illustrate the problem I need help with, which is choosing the right gender when there is no simple noun as the subject of the sentence.

Appreciate your help.

I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

  • Example 1: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

  • Example 2: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

  • Example 3a: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

  • Example 3b: Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he says "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples obviously; these are just off the top of my head to illustrate the problem I need help with, which is choosing the right gender when there is no simple noun as the subject of the sentence.

Appreciate your help.

I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

  • Example 1: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

  • Example 2: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

  • Example 3a: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

  • Example 3b: Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he say "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples obviously; these are just off the top of my head to illustrate the problem I need help with, which is choosing the right gender when there is no simple noun as the subject of the sentence.

Appreciate your help.

3 format
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Struggling with genders Genders in French: So whenWhen not sure, always go with masculine?

I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

Example: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

Example: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

Example: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he says "plus précis/e"?

  • Example 1: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

  • Example 2: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

  • Example 3a: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

  • Example 3b: Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he says "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples obviously; these are just off the top of my head to illustrate the problem I need help with, which is choosing the right gender when there is no simple noun as the subject of the sentence.

Appreciate your help.

Struggling with genders in French: So when not sure, always go with masculine?

I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

Example: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

Example: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

Example: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he says "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples obviously; these are just off the top of my head to illustrate the problem I need help with, which is choosing the right gender when there is no simple noun as the subject of the sentence.

Appreciate your help.

Genders in French: When not sure, always go with masculine?

I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

  • Example 1: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

  • Example 2: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

  • Example 3a: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

  • Example 3b: Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he says "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples obviously; these are just off the top of my head to illustrate the problem I need help with, which is choosing the right gender when there is no simple noun as the subject of the sentence.

Appreciate your help.

2 added 121 characters in body
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I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

Example: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

Example: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

Example: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he says "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples, obviously; these are just off the top of my head to illustrate my difficultythe problem I need help with, which is choosing the right gender when there is no simple noun as the subject of the sentence.

Appreciate your help.

I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

Example: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

Example: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

Example: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he says "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples, these are just off the top of my head to illustrate my difficulty.

Appreciate your help.

I'm overall an intermediate learner (with elementary knowledge in some areas but more advanced than intermediate in others). One area that I'm still struggling with big time, is the gender of words and the complexities of creating agreement.

For instance, sometimes there is no noun (sometimes there is one, but I can't find it).

Example: I mention some infinitive verb or a gerund (e.g. "to live in fear" or "shopping") and then say "is tiring". Where is the noun/noun phrase and what gender is it? So should I say Fatigant/fatigante?

Example: I mention some recent news and then say that it is really bad. But what is bad? So mauvais/mauvaise?

Example: Imagine a written sentence is being criticized by a teacher and thus put in quotation marks, followed by the words "is wrong!" If the whole sentence has a gender, what is it? And so should I choose Faux/Fausse?

Perhaps this teacher follows up by saying that, "It's more accurate to instead say....". Again, what is "it" referring to? Would he says "plus précis/e"?

There are better examples obviously; these are just off the top of my head to illustrate the problem I need help with, which is choosing the right gender when there is no simple noun as the subject of the sentence.

Appreciate your help.

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